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Cold War (1946-1989)

A Journey to the Moon through Texas

This lesson plan is sponsored by the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. In the 1950s and 1960s in the United States, national support and funding for space programs and technological research expanded as the international political climate following World War II gave way to the Cold War. Often referred to as the “Space Race,” the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for supremacy in spaceflight and aerospace technology led to the rapid development of space programs in both countries.

Conquering Polio: A Lecture by David Oshinsky

This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine biography of Alexander Hamilton would inspire a blockbuster Broadway musical?

Texas Digital Newspaper Program

This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and multiple funding sources, TDNP has become a state and national leader in newspaper preservation.

Dolph Briscoe Jr. Exhibit Now on Display at the Briscoe–Garner Museum

This program presents the exhibition and opening of the new Briscoe-Garner Museum. The Briscoe-Garner Museum is one of four divisions of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, an organized research unit of The University of Texas at Austin. The museum is located in the house that served as John Nance Garner's home for more than thirty years. The museum is dedicated to the remarkable lives of John Nance "Cactus Jack" Garner and Dolph Briscoe, both Uvalde natives and historically important political figures from Texas.

Capitol Views

This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and compromise, and of people who planned and worked for its completion.

Austin Streets

This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing of the Declaration of Independence and was well-acquainted with pioneering work, accepted the task.

Behind the Tower: New Histories of the UT Tower Shooting

This is an excellent resource on the history and historical significance of the UT Tower Tragedy. This is a public history project completed by UT History graduate students and the School of Information students under the direction of Dr. Joan Neuberger, professor of Public History at the University of Texas at Austin. It is a well researched (over 7 months) historical work and a resource for anyone interested in learning about this hard but important history.

Dayton history group reviews rice farm consolidation in county

This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and southeast Texas, but especially the background of how Liberty County went from more than 100 rice farmers in the 1970s to just four today.

In a life of firsts, Barbara Jordan won a lasting legacy

This is an article that includes a report and video published by the Houston Chronicle Newspaper on Tuesday June 7, 2016 on the legacy of Barbara Jordan. The video depicts live footage of Barbara Jordan speaking at the 1976 Democratic National Convention in Madison Square Garden. She was the first African American woman to deliver a keynote address at a major party convention.

The National Parks of Texas: In Contact With Beauty

This is a 60 minute documentary that highlights Texas National Parks. This film will help Texans celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. The film celebrates the culture, history, wildlife and natural wonders preserved at each site, and is organized chronologically by date of creation. Big Bend National Park, which opened in 1944 and covers more than 800,000 acres of prickly desert, canyons and mountains, comes first. The program wraps up with Waco Mammoth National Monument, which became part of the National Park Service last July.

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