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Books, Guides, or Other Materials

Print materials such as fiction, non-fiction, curriculum guides, and other media intended to broaden the knowledge of educators or students.

The Hoggs of Texas: Letters and Memoirs of an Extraordinary Family, 1887-1906

In The Hoggs of Texas: Letters and Memoirs of an Extraordinary Family, 1887-1906, Virginia Bernhard delves into the unpublished letters of one of Texas's most extraordinarily families and tells their story. In their own words, which are published here for the first time. Rich in details, the more than four hundred letters in this volume begin in 1887 in 1906, following the family through the hurly-burly of Texas politics and the ups-and-downs of their own lives. The letters illuminate the little-known private life of one of Texas's most famous families.

Matamoros and the Texas Revolution

The traditional story of the Texas Revolution remembers the Alamo and Goliad but has forgotten Matamoros, the strategic Mexican port city on the turbulent lower Rio Grande. In this provocative book, Craig Roell restores the centrality of Matamoros by showing the genuine economic, geographic, social, and military value of the city to Mexican and Texas history. Given that Matamoros served the Mexican states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila and Texas, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosi, Zacatecas, Chihuahua, and Durango, the city's strategic location and considerable trade revenues were crucial.

From a Watery Grave: The Discovery and Excavation of La Salle's Shirpwreck, La Belle

On a frigid, stormy day in February of 1686, a small French sailing ship lost control and ran aground in Matagorda Bay. The crew had braved an ocean voyage, attacks by pirates, raids by Native Americans, and ravaging diseases under the command of famed explorer Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, hoping to establish a colony in the New World. Pounded in the Texas bay by gale winds and storm surges, La Belle finally slipped beneath the water and sank to the bottom, where it would remain for centuries.

La Salle in Texas - Teacher's Guide for the Age of Discovery and Exploration

The excavation of the shipwreck La Belle grabbed public attention in Texas, across the nation, and overseas. Especially enthralled with the discoveries from the ship were schoolchildren. Pam Wheat-Stranahan, named by the Texas Historical Commission to head the educational efforts associated with the excavation’s traveling exhibit, continued her work on this project after leaving the THC. Now, her teacher’s guide, which includes a DVD of acclaimed documentary director Alan Govenar’s films The Shipwreck of La Belle and Dreams of Conquest (about Fort St.

El Mesquite

The open country of Texas between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande was sparsely settled through the nineteenth century, and most of the settlers who did live there had Hispanic names that until recently were rarely admitted into the pages of Texas history. In 1935, however, a descendant of one of the old Spanish land-grant families in the region—a woman, no less—found an ingenious way to publish the history of her region at a time when neither Tejanos nor women had much voice.
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