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Books, Guides, or Other Materials

Print materials such as fiction, non-fiction, curriculum guides, and other media intended to broaden the knowledge of educators or students.

American Armies and Battlefields in Europe: A History, Guide and Reference Book

American Armies and Battlefields in Europe: A History, Guide and Reference Book was first published in 1927 by the American Battle Monuments Commission with almost 600 pages to commemorate America's involvement into World War I. By 1938, the book was expanded with additional research to serve as a history of the American Expeditionary Forces’ accomplishments. Among the contributing authors was Maj. Dwight D. Eisenhower and General John Pershing. This book is considered one of the most comprehensive, historic books of America's involvement in the Great War.

Guide for Lesson Plans: Excerpts from Curriculum Guide for Texas History

The goal of this guide is to enhance your students’ visit to the exhibit A Destined Conflict: The U.S. - Mexican War. The lessons were excerpted from Curriculum Guide for Teaching Texas History, which is available for download at http://www.sanjacintomuseum.org/Education/For_Teachers/. Lesson documents are in PDF format for ease of downloading, but Word versions are available to teachers on request to insure modifications are simple for classroom use. Related images are at https://sanjacintomuseum.smugmug.com/CurriculumGuide in the 4B Texas Annexation and 4C-Statehood sections.

Women and the Rangers: Mothers, Wives & Daughters - Part 1

Women and the Rangers: Mothers, Wives, & Daughters. The words “Texas Ranger” do not usually call to mind the picture of a woman, yet women have played an important part in the history of the Rangers. They have been mothers and grandmothers, sisters and daughters, sweethearts and wives, aunts and nieces, friends and foes. Women were also commissioned as Special Rangers in the 1920s – 1940s, with one even commissioned to serve as a Mansion Guard at the governor’s mansion, a task often performed by Regular Rangers at that time.

Seeing Texas History: Bullock Texas State History Museum

The Bullock Texas State History Museum presents an up-close look at 81 of its artifacts in a full-color coffee-table book, “Seeing Texas History” (University of Texas Press, $40 hardcover). The artifact photographs are arranged chronologically, beginning with an ancient tool made from a rabbit jaw and continuing through cultural and historical items from modern-day Texas. Each picture is accompanied by a short text block. Just a few examples: Davy Crockett’s violin; the U.S.

A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

This book is the most recent publication from TSHA Press. The book was written by Randolph B. Campbell. “Few academic volumes remain timely and relevant more than thirty years after they were first published. This is one of those exceptional books.”—from the foreword by Andrew J. Torget Historians have published countless studies of the American Civil War and the era of Reconstruction that followed those four years of brutally destructive conflict.

El Baile: A Story of Conjunto Music in the Rio Grande Valley

Manuel F. Medrano, historian and Humanities Texas board member, explores the influence of accordionist Valerio Longoria and conjunto music in the Rio Grande Valley, painting a vivid picture of community and celebration inspired by the genre. A thirty-minute documentary on Valerio Longoria, For a Quarter a Song, is made available online by the Los del Valle Oral History Project. El ensayo también se encuentra aquí en español

A Dream of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to 1968

In this history of the modern Civil Rights movement, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Diane McWhorter beautifully describes the process that brought about "the end of apartheid in America," providing a context for the ongoing fight for tolerance and equality in this country. McWhorter focuses on the monumental events that occurred between 1954 (the year of Brown versus the Board of Education) and 1968 (the year that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assasinated).

Almonte's Texas: Juan N. Almonte's 1834 Inspection, Secret Report, and Role in the 1836 Campaign

Dale Farris calls this book " a highly significant, major contribution to the documentation of early Texas history, and greatly adds to the broadening understanding of the roots of the Texas revolution." (Review of Texas Books) In late 1833 Mexico began to have serious fears that its northeastern territory in Texas would be lost to North American colonists. To determine the actual state of affairs, Mexico sent Col. Juan N. Almonte to Texas on an inspection--the last conducted by a high-ranking Mexican official before revolution separated Texas from Mexico.

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