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Humanities Texas

Texas Storytime

Texas Storytime is a program organized by Humanities that promotes childhood literacy and the support of parents and caregivers. The program partners with community libraries across the state and features works from Texas authors that celebrate the diverse cultures around the state. The program will occur for six weeks at the Centennial Branch of the Midland County Public Library beginning February 8, 2018, and concluding March 15, 2018.

Texas Originals: Lorenzo de Zavala

In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent supporter of the Texas Revolution and resigned from the Mexican government.

Texas Originals: Lorenzo de Zavala

In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent supporter of the Texas Revolution and resigned from the Mexican government.

The Dust Bowl

 

This exhibition combines photographs taken of farmers and families by the Farm Security Administration during the dustbowl with compelling interviews taken by Bill Ganzel with survivors to discuss the daily lives, trials, and tribulations these men and women faced during the Dust Bowl.

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

 

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