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Dr. McCaslin discusses the importance of the Spanish reforms after the Marqués de Rubí's inspection of Texas and Spain's northern "frontier" in the 18th century.
Dr. McCaslin takes questions after his presentation on the Marqués de Rubí on October 14, 2015. He discusses the Spanish presidios in Texas, its native peoples, Spanish soldiers experiences, and the Spanish authority during the 18th century.
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
Dr. De la Teja discusses Mission San Jose in Texas. Missions faced many challenges due to the fact that Texas was essentially "beyond the frontier"of Spanish authority in the 18th Century.
Dr. de la Teja discusses Fray Margil and missionaries in New Spain (Central America and Texas). He focuses on the activities of the missions, which includes the conversion of Native Americans.
Dr. De la Teja discusses the Spanish Empire and Christianity as they relate to Fray Margil's mission and experiences in the 17th and 18th Centuries in Texas.
In this video, Dr. Frank de La Teja speaks about how some tend to oversimplify Texas history and there is much more to the story. Dr. de la Teja discusses the unique world of Fray Margil and other characters in Texas in the Spanish Colonial period.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
In this, video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members' questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
This is the complete session with Dr. Jesus de la Teja. He discusses the origins of Mission San Jose and the history of how the Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the...
This lesson plan is sponsored by the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. In the 1950s and 1960s in the United States, national support and funding for space programs and technological research expanded as the international political climate following World War II gave way to the Cold War. Often referred to as the “Space Race,” the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for supremacy in spaceflight...
TAMI is proud to present its newest web exhibit, LA FRONTERA FLUIDA (THE FLUID BORDER). The Texas borderlands are an exceedingly varied and evolving space, one of perpetual conflict and social tension, bi-national negotiation and cooperation, and rich cultural diversity and heritage. At a time when issues like immigration and border security are of increasing political prominence, we must take a closer look at the...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and...
This is an online exhibit from the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin in the early '40s: the population was 114,000; I-35 was yet to be built; the average rent per month was $35; Lyndon Johnson was the congressional representative from this area. Newspaper headlines charted the progress of battles in World War II, and President Roosevelt cautioned that a "long hard war" lay ahead. Smaller,...
This is an online exhibit from the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and draws from materials form the Jane McCallum Papers and highlights the work of the Austin Suffrage Association and women who played key roles in the movement. The majority of the materials in this online exhibit are part of the Jane Y. McCallum Papers (collection number FP E.4) held by the Austin History Center. Documenting not...
This is an online exhibit from the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. This exhibit, originally displayed in April 1994, was a joint presentation of the Austin History Center and the Heritage Society of Austin. Many thanks go to Heritage Society members Gregory Free and Martha Hartzog for using photographs, newspaper clippings, and personal recollections from the Austin History Center's collections...
This is an online exhibit from the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. It showcases many of "memorable Austin firsts." Austin's history has been filled with events great and small, significant and trivial, historic and amusing. All have contributed to building the city that is first in our hearts. Finding these milestones is one of the pleasures of conducting research in the Austin History Center....
This is an excellent resource on the history and historical significance of the UT Tower Tragedy. This is a public history project completed by UT History graduate students and the School of Information students under the direction of Dr. Joan Neuberger, professor of Public History at the University of Texas at Austin. It is a well researched (over 7 months) historical work and a resource for anyone interested in...
This is a virtual tour sponsored by the Texas Historical Commission. Join them for a tour on swimming holes and fireworks. Road trips are a traditional part of Texas summer adventures. During July, the Texas Historical Commission (THC) and Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) will embark on a virtual road trip featuring photos of two of the state’s most iconic landmarks: windmills and water towers. The public is...
This is a map of Mexico and Texas from 1828, housed at the Texas General Land Office in Austin, Texas. The full citation to find the map is the following: Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico, Segun lo organizado y definido por las varias actas del Congreso de dicha Republica: y construido por las mejores autoridades, New York: White, Gallaher, and White, 1828, Map #93846, Holcomb Digital Map Collection, Archives...
This program presents the exhibition and opening of the new Briscoe-Garner Museum. The Briscoe-Garner Museum is one of four divisions of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, an organized research unit of The University of Texas at Austin. The museum is located in the house that served as John Nance Garner's home for more than thirty years. The museum is dedicated to the remarkable lives of John Nance "...
This short documentary highlights the Navarro County Courthouse re-dedication, which took place on July 9, 2016. It discusses the history and effort it takes to re-store historical buildings and then importance of maintaining/preserving historical structures.
El Paso Trails, Saving Some Bison...
This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine...
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