header image
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and...
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is an article that includes a report and video published by the Houston Chronicle Newspaper on Tuesday June 7, 2016 on the legacy of Barbara Jordan. The video depicts live footage of Barbara Jordan speaking at the 1976 Democratic National Convention in Madison Square Garden. She was the first African American woman to deliver a keynote address at a major party convention.
This is a 60 minute documentary that highlights Texas National Parks. This film will help Texans celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. The film celebrates the culture, history, wildlife and natural wonders preserved at each site, and is organized chronologically by date of creation. Big Bend National Park, which opened in 1944 and covers more than 800,000 acres of prickly desert, canyons and...
This is a free digital copy of the book Tejanos Through Time: Selections from the Handbook of Tejano History offered exclusively by the Texas State Historical Association. It highlights Tejano individuals, organizations and events. The book focuses on the special place in history that Tejanos have for having been a province of colonial Spain, a state in the Republic of Mexico, and an independent country before it...
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – The papers of Dr. Hector P. Garcia, Corpus Christi physician and champion of Mexican American civil rights, will soon be easier to view from around the world as part of a processing and digitization project planned by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. The project will do more than just put the documents online, although that is a huge benefit. It will make the collection more...
The Texas Politics Project regularly interviews current and former political journalists, newsmakers, and political actors in order to capture a comprehensive set of contemporary, first person accounts of Texas political history. The project also engages in a range of educational initiatives including maintaining an online Texas politics textbook, offering an online course in Texas politics that meets the state's...
The Bullock Museum features the Texas Story Project - where you can experience the diverse stories of Texas. Through this website you can share your Texas story, or read stories from people across Texas. Visit the website to join the experience.
KXAS was the first television station in Texas and the Southwest when it signed on as WBAP-TV on September 27, 1948. It is an NBC owned station in Fort Worth which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Presented by the UNT Archives, this collection features photographs, video, and scripts from news stories produced by the station during its early years.
"I was the first. Vote for Me!" is an interactive website that brings to life the important firsts in United States and Texas history who are part of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards for Texas elementary students. This website allows students to explore 21 animated historical figures who made significant contributions, paving the way to today. After viewing the animations, students vote on...
Celebrate African American History Month in February! Visit the Handbook of African American Texas from the Texas State Historial Association that features more than 850 entries about all aspects of African-American life and history in Texas. On February 1, 2016, the Texas State Historical Association will offer a FREE promotional eBook, “Struggle and Success: African Americans in Texas,” on the TSHA website. See...
Narrated by Tejano music star Selena Quintanilla-Perez, this 1994 educational video produced by Maverick Video Productions gives a brief overview of Mexican American music, from its historical and cultural influences to its varied musical and dance styles. While Mexican American music abounds in various states across the nation, Selena focuses on Texas and California, highlighting the origins and development of...
In commemoration of the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution, Director Michael Cerny completed a series of sixty-second stories presented by well-known Texans that recall the many exceptional accomplishments made by other Texans. Enjoy this clip featuring Dallas native Owen Wilson as he recounts the life of "Blind" Willie Johnson, a gospel blues singer and guitarist. Made by Michael Cerny.
There are many ways that people learn about their past, their culture, and their traditions. While much of this knowledge can be gained through books, history and culture can also be passed down through experiences and personal records. One such record that can teach more about the past is the home movie. Home movies enable the engaged observer to learn about ways of life from the not-so-distant past. Styles,...
This collection contains photographs and archival material related primarily to Mexican American families in Houston.
John J. Herrera was an attorney in Houston, Texas and president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). He was very active in advocating for civil rights for Hispanic and Mexican Americans in Houston. Herrera's extensive archive of materials are primarily related to his activities with LULAC.
The lesson plan was developed collaboratively by Texas History curriculum writer Beth Hudson (Austin ISD), Dr. Bryan Stone, author of The Chosen Folks: Jews on the Frontiers of Texas; and PEI professionals. It utilizes standards in multiple strands, e.g., religious freedom; frontier expansion, cattle, oil, and railroad industries; and civil rights, to explore the impact made to and on Texas by multiple unique racial...
How do you use objects and images in your classroom to inspire curiousity? Our engaging "Images in the Classroom" activity will help teach your students how to analyze and interpret images.
This easy to incorporate activity will inspire inquiry-based learning that will teach your students how to analyze and interpret objects, and bring the museum experience to your classroom!
Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and the first Army woman to earn the rank of colonel. President Eisenhower chose her as Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, making her the second woman in history to be appointed to a president’s cabinet. When she...
Award-winning author Debra L. Winegarten gives a compelling interactive lecture on the role of Oveta Culp Hobby, a Killeen native, and traces her life through the use of story-telling, photographs, and video as she recounts the tale of the Director of the Women's Army Corps, the first woman to earn the rank of Army colonel, and the second woman in the US appointed to a presidential cabinet-level position.
avatar-url