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Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
This collection contains materials from John Goodwin Tower, a Southwestern alumnus, represented Texas in the United States Senate from 1961 through 1984. Before his retirement, he named Southwestern University as the official repository for his papers. The approximately 800 linear feet of materials primarily reflect his Senate activities and include documents, legislative files, correspondence, speeches, campaign...
This collection contains roughly 70 interviews of Baytown residents which reflect the history of Baytown. This collection was created between 1968 to the early 1980s. The Baytown Oral History Collection includes stories on the following Texas topics: History of the Humble Oil & Refinery Co., Hurricane Carla, the Great Depression, a Baytown Lynching, History of (Middletown) Pelly, History of Baytown’s...
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This is the biography featured by NASA on JUDITH A. RESNIK (PH.D.) NASA ASTRONAUT from Texas who was aboard the Challenger. PERSONAL DATA: Born April 5, 1949, in Akron, Ohio. Died January 28, 1986. Unmarried. She was a classical pianist and also enjoyed bicycling, running, and flying during her free time. EDUCATION: Graduated from Firestone High School, Akron, Ohio, in 1966; received a bachelor of science degree in...
In this history of the modern Civil Rights movement, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Diane McWhorter beautifully describes the process that brought about "the end of apartheid in America," providing a context for the ongoing fight for tolerance and equality in this country. McWhorter focuses on the monumental events that occurred between 1954 (the year of Brown versus the Board of Education) and 1968 (the year that Dr...
This lesson explores this unique period of growth in the U.S. space program focusing on the role of the Manned Spacecraft Center (now the Johnson Space Center) and the contributions of workers at the Texas site. Using films produced by NASA and staff at the Manned Spacecraft Center, as well as home movies and other promotional films, students will gain a greater understanding of the developments within the space...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
This lesson plan is sponsored by the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. In the 1950s and 1960s in the United States, national support and funding for space programs and technological research expanded as the international political climate following World War II gave way to the Cold War. Often referred to as the “Space Race,” the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for supremacy in spaceflight...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and...
This is an excellent resource on the history and historical significance of the UT Tower Tragedy. This is a public history project completed by UT History graduate students and the School of Information students under the direction of Dr. Joan Neuberger, professor of Public History at the University of Texas at Austin. It is a well researched (over 7 months) historical work and a resource for anyone interested in...
This program presents the exhibition and opening of the new Briscoe-Garner Museum. The Briscoe-Garner Museum is one of four divisions of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, an organized research unit of The University of Texas at Austin. The museum is located in the house that served as John Nance Garner's home for more than thirty years. The museum is dedicated to the remarkable lives of John Nance "...
This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine...
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
This is an article that includes a report and video published by the Houston Chronicle Newspaper on Tuesday June 7, 2016 on the legacy of Barbara Jordan. The video depicts live footage of Barbara Jordan speaking at the 1976 Democratic National Convention in Madison Square Garden. She was the first African American woman to deliver a keynote address at a major party convention.
This is a 60 minute documentary that highlights Texas National Parks. This film will help Texans celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. The film celebrates the culture, history, wildlife and natural wonders preserved at each site, and is organized chronologically by date of creation. Big Bend National Park, which opened in 1944 and covers more than 800,000 acres of prickly desert, canyons and...
Winegarten takes questions from the audience after her webinar presentation on Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby.
Winegarten discusses women’s importance in the auxiliary units and Colonel Hobby roles during World War II. Oveta was honored for her service and later appointment to the presidential cabinet, the second woman to ever hold that position. She became the secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare during the time of the polio vaccine’s approval, which Winegarten discusses frankly with viewers. Lastly, she discusses...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's life after she meets governor Hobby. She explains how Oveta was brought in to the WWII efforts and how women became involved. She moves to D.C. to run the Women’s’ Interest Bureau for the Army. As more men are drafted, women are looked at to help more. Oveta was asked to draw up a plan for a women’s army unit and eventually asked to run it. Winegarten explains how history from today and...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's early childhood in Killeen, Texas and her experience working with her father in the Texas legislature. Her father was an attorney and in the Texas state legislature. Her mother was a suffragist. Oveta’s name is discussed, which is an Iroquois word for forget; however, Winegarten discusses why Oveta was one of the most unforgettable women in Texas history. By age 20 she was the youngest...
Winegarten introduces the viewers to the early life of Oveta Culp Hobby, who grew from a precocious child in Killeen, Texas to an Army colonel, presidential cabinet member, and owner of a media empire in Houston.
This is a free digital copy of the book Tejanos Through Time: Selections from the Handbook of Tejano History offered exclusively by the Texas State Historical Association. It highlights Tejano individuals, organizations and events. The book focuses on the special place in history that Tejanos have for having been a province of colonial Spain, a state in the Republic of Mexico, and an independent country before it...
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – The papers of Dr. Hector P. Garcia, Corpus Christi physician and champion of Mexican American civil rights, will soon be easier to view from around the world as part of a processing and digitization project planned by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. The project will do more than just put the documents online, although that is a huge benefit. It will make the collection more...
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