header image
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
This collection contains roughly 70 interviews of Baytown residents which reflect the history of Baytown. This collection was created between 1968 to the early 1980s. The Baytown Oral History Collection includes stories on the following Texas topics: History of the Humble Oil & Refinery Co., Hurricane Carla, the Great Depression, a Baytown Lynching, History of (Middletown) Pelly, History of Baytown’s...
This collection consists of approximately 100 interviews of Baytown veterans who served in wars and during peacetime. These stories highlight experiences from World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and Operation Desert Storm.
Through the analysis of primary-source archival footage from TAMI’s interactive web exhibit, “Weathering Texas,” students will demonstrate an understanding of extreme weather events in Texas during the 20th and 21st centuries. Teachers will take students in grades 3 - 8 on a “guided tour” of “Weathering Texas,” where students will explore the historical context of certain events and the conditions that made them...
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This book is about the Pecan shellers strike in San Antonio. On January 31, 1938, some 10,000 pecan plant workers walked off their jobs in San Antonio. The strikers — primarily Mexican-American women — were fed up with toiling in the city’s stuffy, tuberculosis-inducing pecan-shelling plants, shredding their fingers for 6 cents a pound. Activist Emma Tenayuca, nicknamed “La Pasionaria” for her fiery personality,...
As America entered WWII, it was apparent that U.S. naval aviation technology ranked behind Japanese technology. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer discuss the changes to U.S. military technology and mindset during the 1940s
Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer describe the period of American globalization and expansion of commerce that preceded the attack on Pearl Harbor, and detail the reasons for engaging in war with Japan.
Part one of the Texas Talk, The 75th Commemoration of Pearl Harbor and the Texas Connection with James D. Hornfischer. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer respond to the question of how Pearl Harbor resonates with audiences 75 years later.
The 75th Commemoration of Pearl Harbor and the Texas Connection with James D. Hornfischer. Bestselling author James D. Hornfischer and Joe Cavanaugh from the National Museum of the Pacific War discuss the history surrounding the attack on Pearl Harbor and its connection to Texas. Admiral Chester Nimitz was named the commander-in-chief of the Pacific Fleet weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and led America's...
Women and the Rangers: Mothers, Wives, & Daughters. The words “Texas Ranger” do not usually call to mind the picture of a woman, yet women have played an important part in the history of the Rangers. They have been mothers and grandmothers, sisters and daughters, sweethearts and wives, aunts and nieces, friends and foes. Women were also commissioned as Special Rangers in the 1920s – 1940s, with one even...
THEME: The completion of the transcontinental railroad not only made it easier to transport goods and people across the country, it also put an end to the hard work of the thousands of immigrant railroad workers and Americans who constructed the railroad. Its completion was cause for much celebration, that's why the Golden Spike Ceremony took place. SUBJECTS: Language Arts, History, Drama OBJECTIVES: To gain an...
Transcontinental Railroad offers insights into topics in American history including the settling of the West; manifest destiny; contact and conflicts between Native Americans and white settlers; experiences of workers, including Chinese immigrants and Civil War veterans, in building the railroad; 19th century speculators and the rush to claim land; the Crédit Mobilier scandal and the backroom dealings that financed...
Lone Star Legacy is an online journal that details the struggles, existence, and triumphs of trailblazing men and women who have contributed to African-American History throughout Texas. Lone Star Legacy welcomes Poetry, Photographs, Interviews, Prose, Essays, and Journalistic Articles that capture extraordinary stories about everyday people and events connected to the great state of Texas. Lone Star Legacy is...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
This is a new online exhibit, that features a rich blend of images, videos, first-person interviews, maps, and useful visitor information for exploring historical sites across Texas. Download the app directly to your iOS or Android device. The Texas Historical Commission’s mobile tour World War II on the Texas Home Front explores the legacy of the war effort in Texas. From Navy shipbuilding yards and Army airfields...
This is a travel guide prepared by the Texas Historical Commission with extensive information on Texas' involvement in World War II.It includes a day by day timeline, a historical synopsis of the history of Texas before and after the War, and sites of WWII in Texas.
This is an online secondary source resource for anyone interested in learning about World War I with Texas Historical Commission resources.This source is sponsored by Texas Time Travel.
Winegarten takes questions from the audience after her webinar presentation on Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby.
Winegarten discusses the importance of women in the auxiliary units and Colonel Hobbys roles during World War II. Oveta was honored for her service and later appointment to the presidential cabinet, the second woman to ever hold that position. She became the secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare during the time of the polio vaccine’s approval, which Winegarten discusses with viewers. Lastly, she discusses the...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's life after she met governor Hobby. She explains how Oveta was brought in to the WWII efforts and got women involved. Oveta moved to D.C. to run the Women’s’ Interest Bureau for the Army. As more men are drafted, women were looked at more and more for help. Oveta was asked to draw up a plan for a women’s army unit and eventually asked to run it. Winegarten reveals a number of challenges...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's early childhood in Killeen, Texas and her experience working with her father in the Texas legislature. Her father was an attorney and served in the Texas state legislature. Her mother was a suffragist. Oveta’s name is an Iroquois word for forget; however, Winegarten discusses why Oveta was one of the most unforgettable women in Texas history. By age 20 she was the youngest...
Winegarten introduces the viewers to the early life of Oveta Culp Hobby, who grew from a precocious child in Killeen, Texas to an Army colonel, presidential cabinet member, and owner of a media empire in Houston.
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and...
avatar-url