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Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
 An annual free daylong cultural and educational event of speakers, programs, demonstrations, music, and exhibits which expand on a different theme each year.  This event is reminiscent of the old Chautauqua held in Waxahachie 1900-1930.   This event is held on September 30 every year at the Historic Chautauqua Auditorium and the surrounding area in Waxahachie, Texas.
Through the analysis of primary-source archival footage from TAMI’s interactive web exhibit, “Weathering Texas,” students will demonstrate an understanding of extreme weather events in Texas during the 20th and 21st centuries. Teachers will take students in grades 3 - 8 on a “guided tour” of “Weathering Texas,” where students will explore the historical context of certain events and the conditions that made them...
The German-Texan Heritage Society Annual Conference will be at the University Baptist Church in Austin on July 21-22. Dr. Tom Alter, Dr. Matt Tippens, Dr. Walter Kamphoefner, Dr. Peter Buckingham, and Dr. Kyle Wilkison are among the speakers this year. The theme this year will focus on the effects WWI had on German-Texans due to the Red Scare and the Agrarian Socialist movement many German-Texans belonged to.
Texans Take to the Trenches: WWI The Lone Star State and the Great War is an online exhibit from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission to mark the 100th anniversary of the "Great War." More than 198,000 Texans joined the United States military, and even more contributed to the war effort on the home front. This exhibit featuring primary documents, includes both documents and images. There is a companion...
The Texas World War I Centennial organization is part of the National World War I Centennial Commission (WWICC). Texas is committed to commemorating the role of Texas and Texans in the Great War, especially as we approach the 100 year anniversary of U.S. involvement in 2017-2019. In Texas our goals are: Information and Awareness. Increase awareness of the general public about the role of Texas and Texans the Great...
No Man’s Land: East Texas African Americans in WWI will be traveling throughout Texas over the two-year centennial period (2017-2019). Come walk among the eleven thousand veteran names on display and learn their stories: men who died in combat, served as officers, unloaded ships, buried the dead, kept the sawmills going, trained for war on Texas college campuses, and in some cases, deserted. You will see the Great...
This is a blog that explores the history of the Great War (WWI) and the lives of American Soldiers through out. It is featured by the US. National Archives in Washington DC. When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, President Woodrow Wilson undertook a massive propaganda campaign to expand support for the war. He declared that, America would help make the world “safe for democracy.” Democracy...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
TAMI is happy to release its newest lesson plan, Texas in Transition: Social, Political, and Economic Issues in 1920s Texas. Completely free and full of primary source materials, Texas in Transition uses a project-based learning approach to improve retention of new content and develop students’ personal ties to the past. Accompanying worksheets and an annotated list of resources for additional research are also...
Women and the Rangers: Mothers, Wives, & Daughters. The words “Texas Ranger” do not usually call to mind the picture of a woman, yet women have played an important part in the history of the Rangers. They have been mothers and grandmothers, sisters and daughters, sweethearts and wives, aunts and nieces, friends and foes. Women were also commissioned as Special Rangers in the 1920s – 1940s, with one even...
Transcontinental Railroad offers insights into topics in American history including the settling of the West; manifest destiny; contact and conflicts between Native Americans and white settlers; experiences of workers, including Chinese immigrants and Civil War veterans, in building the railroad; 19th century speculators and the rush to claim land; the Crédit Mobilier scandal and the backroom dealings that financed...
Lone Star Legacy is an online journal that details the struggles, existence, and triumphs of trailblazing men and women who have contributed to African-American History throughout Texas. Lone Star Legacy welcomes Poetry, Photographs, Interviews, Prose, Essays, and Journalistic Articles that capture extraordinary stories about everyday people and events connected to the great state of Texas. Lone Star Legacy is...
The lumber industry has played a key role in the economic development of Texas since the end of the Civil War. Timber production in East Texas was partially responsible for the rapid growth of railroads in the state, as well as the development of the Texas paper industry and the rise of both residential and commercial building. However, jobs in the lumber industry have been considered as some of the most hazardous...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library. Austin's street history truly begins in 1839, just prior to the city's founding, when Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, commissioned his old war-time friend Edwin Waller to survey the site for the new capital city and to oversee its planning and construction. Waller, who had participated in the signing...
This is an online exhibit featured by the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and highlights Austin history through views of its Capitol. The current capitol, built in 1888, is the fourth building in Austin to house the offices of the Texas government. It is a story of an engineering and construction feat to equal few others of its time, of financial and political maneuvering, of struggle and...
This is an online exhibit from the Austin History Center and the Austin Public Library and draws from materials form the Jane McCallum Papers and highlights the work of the Austin Suffrage Association and women who played key roles in the movement. The majority of the materials in this online exhibit are part of the Jane Y. McCallum Papers (collection number FP E.4) held by the Austin History Center. Documenting not...
This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine...
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is a video documentary about one of the Harry Ransom Center's most famous and frequently borrowed art works, Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940). The video documentary features interviews with curators and installers, the video narrates the painting's return to the Ransom Center, its unpacking and assessment, and finally, its installation on the first floor.
This is a newspaper article on the North Texas Masonic Historical Museum and Library located on the first floor of the Plano Masonic Lodge. It provides a brief history of the building, its beginnings and what it represents for the community and for Texas at Large. The article is also calling for assistance in the restoration and preservation of the historic building that houses the museum.
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
This is a primary document of John Mitchell's oath of office. John Mitchell was one one of the first African American to be elected to the Texas House of Representatives. African Americans in Texas experienced the right to vote for the first time between February 10–14, 1868. After the 11th Texas Legislature met in 1866 and refused to pass the amendments abolishing slavery and granting citizenship to African...
This is a primary document. It is the Oath of Office document of Richard Allen, one of Texas' first African American Legislator. Richard Allen (1830–1909) was born enslaved in Richmond, Virginia, and arrived in Harris County with slave owner J. J. Cain in 1837. As a young man, Allen gained a solid reputation for construction and engineering work, and designed and helped to build the impressive Houston mansion of...
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