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Jim Woodrick from the Texas History Snippets blog has created a valuable resource for classrooms and anyone interested in Texas history. Through the Digital Interactive Map, users can click on locations and roads that were significant to the history of Texas. Specifically, the site includes content from the Spanish Colonial Period, Mexican Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and Texas in the late...
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
The purpose of this lesson is to have students understand the reasons for Spanish settlement of the El Paso valley in Texas, events that transpired there, and what life was like for Indians and Spanish settlers. Students will work in cooperative groups to view examples of rock art, research the culture that produced it, and write a short, guided essay describing the rock art’s origins.
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
Dr. Emilio Zamora and Dr. Andrés Tijerina discuss the background of the Handbook of Tejano History project and their work with the Texas State Historical Association. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
This is the full webinar of Bill O'Neal's Texas Talk From the Alamo to San Jacinto. State Historian of Texas Bill O’Neal focuses this Texas Talk on two key battles of the Texas Revolution: the battle of the Alamo and San Jacinto. He expands on these two battles that became the most notable during the Texas Revolution. He provides a fascinating talk on historical figures and heroes of the Texas Revolution. Bill O’...
The portrait of Bernardo de Galvez hangs in Congress today. Bernardo de Galvez was voted the eighth honorary citizen of the United States due to his tremendous courage and assistance to the Americans in the American Revolution.
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
This video is sponsored by Texas Counties. In times of disaster, the county judge must step up to serve his or her community, and rise above the normal duties of the office, keeping county residents safe and becoming the hero the county deserves.
This is an educational video about Texas geography, particularly counties in Texas
While the physical geography of the state has remained largely unaltered since 1823, the way that people use the land around them has changed significantly. Westward expansion, the livestock industry, and the discovery of oil all helped to alter the face of our great state. Students in grades four through eight will explore the physical and cultural geography of Texas in relation to such concepts as scale, direction...
Lone Star Legacy is an online journal that details the struggles, existence, and triumphs of trailblazing men and women who have contributed to African-American History throughout Texas. Lone Star Legacy welcomes Poetry, Photographs, Interviews, Prose, Essays, and Journalistic Articles that capture extraordinary stories about everyday people and events connected to the great state of Texas. Lone Star Legacy is...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, a vocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk, such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville, she met a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune from steam boating but was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He became one of the richest ranchers behind Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin married in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela Vidal Kenedy, who became the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in the census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appeared that her children were born...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decided to move her family to New Orleans which she sold her ranch property to do. By 1845, Patricia returned to Texas and her children scattered. Many became involved in court battles....
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who had 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. The location of the colony created political issues and discord, as it was surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commissioner and was in charge of assigning land to...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia de Leon's life. Patricia donates her entire dowry to her husband to purchase land for what becomes the de Leon colony in Texas at the beginning of the 19th century. She gives birth to ten children who live through Mexican Independence in Mexico and Texas. The family returns to live in Mexico during the time of the Battle of Medina in Texas, which was devastating for many families and...
Dr. Crimm's full Texas Talks on two Tejano women: Patricia de Leon and Petra Vela Kenedy, recorded in December 2015, contrasts these women's experiences in 19th century Texas. Patricia de la Garza de Leon was born in 1775 from a prominent Mexican family. She inherited a fortune from her father, which she used, along with her empresario husband, Martin de Leon’s money earned from the sale of livestock to establish...
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