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Jim Woodrick from the Texas History Snippets blog has created a valuable resource for classrooms and anyone interested in Texas history. Through the Digital Interactive Map, users can click on locations and roads that were significant to the history of Texas. Specifically, the site includes content from the Spanish Colonial Period, Mexican Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and Texas in the late...
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
The purpose of this lesson is to have students understand the reasons for Spanish settlement of the El Paso valley in Texas, events that transpired there, and what life was like for Indians and Spanish settlers. Students will work in cooperative groups to view examples of rock art, research the culture that produced it, and write a short, guided essay describing the rock art’s origins.
One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
Dr. Emilio Zamora and Dr. Andrés Tijerina discuss the background of the Handbook of Tejano History project and their work with the Texas State Historical Association. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Site Manager, Cody Mobley, explores the history of the Post Headquarters and the Sergeant Major’s Office at Fort McKavett State Historic Site. Cody explains how the building developed and changed over time, as well as, the various business conducted in the rooms of the building. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
This is the full webinar of Bill O'Neal's Texas Talk From the Alamo to San Jacinto. State Historian of Texas Bill O’Neal focuses this Texas Talk on two key battles of the Texas Revolution: the battle of the Alamo and San Jacinto. He expands on these two battles that became the most notable during the Texas Revolution. He provides a fascinating talk on historical figures and heroes of the Texas Revolution. Bill O’...
This is a 7:16 min clip of Gregg Dimmick's Texas Talk. Dimmick discusses the tensions regarding the returning of the cannon from Gonzales and more. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
The portrait of Bernardo de Galvez hangs in Congress today. Bernardo de Galvez was voted the eighth honorary citizen of the United States due to his tremendous courage and assistance to the Americans in the American Revolution.
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
This article is a secondary source on the flag makers of the Texas Revolution.
This book is the most recent publication from TSHA Press. The book was written by Randolph B. Campbell. “Few academic volumes remain timely and relevant more than thirty years after they were first published. This is one of those exceptional books.”—from the foreword by Andrew J. Torget Historians have published countless studies of the American Civil War and the era of Reconstruction that followed those four years...
This is a lesson plan that highlights the Alamo. Remembering through education. The Alamo strives to meet the needs of today’s classroom teachers. We realize that the school year moves quickly, making planning critical. This Alamo Educator Packet is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge...
This is an educational video about Texas geography, particularly counties in Texas
Lone Star Legacy is an online journal that details the struggles, existence, and triumphs of trailblazing men and women who have contributed to African-American History throughout Texas. Lone Star Legacy welcomes Poetry, Photographs, Interviews, Prose, Essays, and Journalistic Articles that capture extraordinary stories about everyday people and events connected to the great state of Texas. Lone Star Legacy is...
This book, includes transcriptions of original documents containing Mexican Col. Juan N. Almonte's 1834 report concerning the measures necessary to prevent the loss of Texas, as well as fifty of his letters, and the journal he kept while at the side of Santa Anna during the Texas rebellion in 1836. This book is part of the collection entitled: Texas State Historical Association Monographs and was provided by Texas...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, a vocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk, such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
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