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Jim Woodrick from the Texas History Snippets blog has created a valuable resource for classrooms and anyone interested in Texas history. Through the Digital Interactive Map, users can click on locations and roads that were significant to the history of Texas. Specifically, the site includes content from the Spanish Colonial Period, Mexican Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and Texas in the late...
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
The purpose of this lesson is to have students understand the reasons for Spanish settlement of the El Paso valley in Texas, events that transpired there, and what life was like for Indians and Spanish settlers. Students will work in cooperative groups to view examples of rock art, research the culture that produced it, and write a short, guided essay describing the rock art’s origins.
The Texas Historical Commission has launched a web documentary film about the Massacre at Goliad. 360* camera technology was used to be attractive and immersive for Texas history students. It can be viewed on laptop, cell phone, tablet, VR headsets or on the THC website. A Chrome browser provides the best experience. All of the sites for the Massacre were shot on location and the artifacts shown were gathered from...
This collection contains materials from John Goodwin Tower, a Southwestern alumnus, represented Texas in the United States Senate from 1961 through 1984. Before his retirement, he named Southwestern University as the official repository for his papers. The approximately 800 linear feet of materials primarily reflect his Senate activities and include documents, legislative files, correspondence, speeches, campaign...
This collection contains roughly 70 interviews of Baytown residents which reflect the history of Baytown. This collection was created between 1968 to the early 1980s. The Baytown Oral History Collection includes stories on the following Texas topics: History of the Humble Oil & Refinery Co., Hurricane Carla, the Great Depression, a Baytown Lynching, History of (Middletown) Pelly, History of Baytown’s...
Through the analysis of primary-source archival footage from TAMI’s interactive web exhibit, “Weathering Texas,” students will demonstrate an understanding of extreme weather events in Texas during the 20th and 21st centuries. Teachers will take students in grades 3 - 8 on a “guided tour” of “Weathering Texas,” where students will explore the historical context of certain events and the conditions that made them...
This is a digitized collection of articles on Dr. May Owen, past president of various medical institutions including the Texas Society of Pathologists, the Tarrant County Medical Society, and the Texas Medical Association dating from 1912-2003. These are collected in the the Portal to Texas History, an online database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The articles are provided by the Texas Medical...
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This is the biography featured by NASA on JUDITH A. RESNIK (PH.D.) NASA ASTRONAUT from Texas who was aboard the Challenger. PERSONAL DATA: Born April 5, 1949, in Akron, Ohio. Died January 28, 1986. Unmarried. She was a classical pianist and also enjoyed bicycling, running, and flying during her free time. EDUCATION: Graduated from Firestone High School, Akron, Ohio, in 1966; received a bachelor of science degree in...
This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
Women and the Rangers: Mothers, Wives, & Daughters. The words “Texas Ranger” do not usually call to mind the picture of a woman, yet women have played an important part in the history of the Rangers. They have been mothers and grandmothers, sisters and daughters, sweethearts and wives, aunts and nieces, friends and foes. Women were also commissioned as Special Rangers in the 1920s – 1940s, with one even...
Dr. Emilio Zamora and Dr. Andrés Tijerina discuss the background of the Handbook of Tejano History project and their work with the Texas State Historical Association. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Site Manager, Cody Mobley, explores the history of the Post Headquarters and the Sergeant Major’s Office at Fort McKavett State Historic Site. Cody explains how the building developed and changed over time, as well as, the various business conducted in the rooms of the building. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
State Historian Bill O'Neal concludes his session by taking live question and answers after his Texas Revolution talk. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
State Historian Bill O’Neal talks about the battle of San Jacinto, the concluding military event that deemed the Texas Revolution victorious over Mexico. He shares specific statistics, tactics, and motivations that pushed the Texans to victory in only 18 minutes. Houston came out as the hero after the battle of San Jacinto when he captured General Santa Anna. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State...
State Historian Bill O’Neal talks about the Runaway Scrape that occurred after the fall of the Alamo. The Runaway Scrape refers to the flight from their homes of Texans when Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna began his attempted conquest of Texas in February 1836. The first communities to be affected were those in the south central portions of Texas around San Patricio, Refugio, and San Antonio. The people began to leave...
Bill O’Neal discusses the fall of the Alamo and deaths of many Anglo Texans including William Barrett Travis, James Bowie, and others who fought to the death. He explains how the fighting only lasted 90 minutes, and comments on the aftermath and casualties on both sides. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
State Historian Bill O’Neal describes James Bowie, giving a brief history of his accomplishments in Texas and his role in its history leading up to the Texas Revolution. Bowie was a major figure who fought in The Battle of the Alamo and explained his efforts and courage that motivated many Texas to continue fighting against Mexican forces until their final victory at The Battle of San Jacinto. He also talks about...
State Historian Bill O'Neal introduces the battle of the Alamo, considered an iconic call to arms in the Texas Revolution and a shrine to Texas liberty. O'Neal describes how a small presidio mission established in 1718 by Franciscan missionaries in San Antonio became a source of Texas martyrdom and pride. O'Neal also introduces some of the main figures who played an important role, including Antonio Lopez de Santa...
This is the full webinar of Bill O'Neal's Texas Talk From the Alamo to San Jacinto. State Historian of Texas Bill O’Neal focuses this Texas Talk on two key battles of the Texas Revolution: the battle of the Alamo and San Jacinto. He expands on these two battles that became the most notable during the Texas Revolution. He provides a fascinating talk on historical figures and heroes of the Texas Revolution. Bill O’...
This is a 7:16 min clip of Gregg Dimmick's Texas Talk. Dimmick discusses the tensions regarding the returning of the cannon from Gonzales and more. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
The portrait of Bernardo de Galvez hangs in Congress today. Bernardo de Galvez was voted the eighth honorary citizen of the United States due to his tremendous courage and assistance to the Americans in the American Revolution.
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
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