header image
This online exhibit features a rich blend of images, videos, first-person interviews, maps, and useful visitor information for exploring historical sites across Texas. Two cannons found in Texas fifty miles apart: one buried in the mud twelve feet below the surface of Matagorda Bay, the other uncovered by a ranch foreman. Together, they solved a centuries-old mystery and set archeologists on a fascinating journey...
Texas would not be Texas without the profound influence of Hispanic leaders and citizens, whose legacies form an essential pillar of Texas history. We invite you to explore the contributions of Hispanic histories of the Lone Star State and to discover your own connections to the diverse and deeply rooted Hispanic communities of Texas. Part travel guide, part historical document, this tour takes you to the places...
The San Felipe de Austin was a colony founded by Stephen. F. Austin in 1823 about 50 miles west of what is now Houston. The town was early hub of commerce and governance for American settlers in Texas and played a significant role in the Texas Revolution, though not as deeply recognized by the public as other historic sites in Texas. To expand the public interest and knowledge of San Felipe de Austin, the Texas...
Not Even Past presents the spring film series, Faces of Migration. Each film will be introduced by a faculty member and will be followed by an audience discussion about the themes and questions raised by each film. Specifically, the films will examine the needs, desires, and challenges that migrants face around the globe. Sharing stories and experiences will be encouraged. The films may provide relevence to...
Jim Woodrick from the Texas History Snippets blog has created a valuable resource for classrooms and anyone interested in Texas history. Through the Digital Interactive Map, users can click on locations and roads that were significant to the history of Texas. Specifically, the site includes content from the Spanish Colonial Period, Mexican Texas, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and Texas in the late...
Trammel’s Trace tells the story of a borderlands smuggler and an important passageway into early Texas. Trammel’s Trace, named for Nicholas Trammell, was the first route from the United States into the northern boundaries of Spanish Texas. From the Great Bend of the Red River it intersected with El Camino Real de los Tejas in Nacogdoches. By the early nineteenth century, Trammel’s Trace was largely a smuggler’s...
2018 marks the 300th anniversary of San Antonio. To commemorate the occasion, the Alamo presents the Tricentennial Educator Workshop Series. The series of workshops will cover the eras of Texas History from 1400-1836. Specifically, the series will focus on the significant role of the Alamo over the 300 years of San Antonio history. The intended audience for each workshop is educators and CPE credit hours are offered...
In 2018, San Antonio will celebrate its 300th anniversary. In participation with the celebration, the Alamo will be presenting the Alamo Tricentennial Lecture Series. The series will feature talks and lectures by different experts each month. Each speaker will shed light on the people, events, and themes that have shaped the history of the Alamo, San Antonio, and Texas. The first lecture will be...
We are one month away from the San Antonio Tricentennial. In an effort to promote San Antonio history, the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures has distributed lesson plans based off of the keynotes, breakout sessions, and fieldnotes of the SA300 institute for educators. Lesson plans are available for students at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. These lesson plans cover topics in San Antonio...
The UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures has distributed lesson plans based off of the keynotes, breakout sessions, and fieldnotes of the SA300 institute for educators. In this lesson, students investigate maps, photographs, and readings in order to understand mission life during the Spanish colonial period. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the significance of missions in the early history of the...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
The Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the missions inspired the Texas State Historical Association to feature Dr. Jesús “Frank” de la Teja, Director for the Center for...
Every year since 1897, the Texas State Historical Association has held an annual meeting. The largest gathering of its kind for Texas history enthusiasts. Join the leaders in the field for three days of sessions, networking, events, and professional development that will expand your knowledge, energize you, and help you to deepen your connections with the state's extraordinary past.
Lonesome Dove, a new traveling exhibition created by the Wittliff Collections at the Alkek Library, Texas State University, and presented in partnership with Humanities Texas features fifty-five framed and matted sepia tone photographs of the Lonesome Dove miniseries, which first aired on CBS in 1989. This miniseries is based off Lonesome Dove- Larry McMurty’s epic novel of two...
TSHA hosts the Exploring Texas Workshop Series every year. Teachers in attendance can receive professional development credit for attending sessions with accessible historical content and pedagogoical advice from renowned scholars, respected classroom practicioners, and organizations with expertise in the fields of history, geography, economics, civics, and skill building.2017-2018 ScheduleAmarillo - July 21,...
Over the course of this lesson plan students will learn to explain the significant role that Spanish missions played in the early history of Texas and the Southwest, describe the psychological and cultural factors that led the Coahuiltecan Indians to accept mission life, explain the role irrigation systems, such as acequias, played in the development of Texas farmland and other arid areas, and...
Students will locate San Antonio River, acequis and missions on aerial photographs.  They will also assume the persona of a member of the Catholic Church, the military, or a Spanish colonist and practice writing a petition to the Spanish Crown.  The ultimate goal will be to have students understand how the Spanish system of colonization and water usage influenced San Antonio.
The purpose of this lesson is to have students understand the reasons for Spanish settlement of the El Paso valley in Texas, events that transpired there, and what life was like for Indians and Spanish settlers. Students will work in cooperative groups to view examples of rock art, research the culture that produced it, and write a short, guided essay describing the rock art’s origins.
An annual conference, established in 2009,  which highlights and emphasizes the history of Texas and the role Texans have played in shaping the history of the United States. Each year academics, authors, and enthusiasts gather to discuss themes related to Texas and its place in history.  Previous themes include: World War I, The Alamo, The Civil War and The City of Austin.
Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads. This exhibition is available for rent, with current bookings...
Deep in the Vaults of Texas: A Campus Collaboration brings together diverse artifacts from archives, museums, and repositories across The University of Texas at Austin campus. Displayed at the LBJ Presidential Library, the exhibit showcases items from a wide range of time periods and locations and underscores the richness and depth of the university’s holdings – from early Texas arrowheads to Renaissance paintings...
Featuring maps dating from 1513 to 1920, the special exhibition Mapping Texas: From Frontier to the Lone Star Statetraces more than 400 years of Texas history. Visitors will have the opportunity to see the formation of Texas, from an unnamed frontier in the New World, to a small outpost of New Spain, to the huge, bustling state that now leads the nation.Through this unique presentation of cartographic...
Dr. Emilio Zamora and Dr. Andrés Tijerina discuss the background of the Handbook of Tejano History project and their work with the Texas State Historical Association. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
This is the full webinar of Bill O'Neal's Texas Talk From the Alamo to San Jacinto. State Historian of Texas Bill O’Neal focuses this Texas Talk on two key battles of the Texas Revolution: the battle of the Alamo and San Jacinto. He expands on these two battles that became the most notable during the Texas Revolution. He provides a fascinating talk on historical figures and heroes of the Texas Revolution. Bill O’...
avatar-url