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This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
Texas Perspectives is a wire-style service produced by The University of Texas at Austin that is intended to provide media outlets with meaningful and thoughtful opinion columns (op-eds) on a variety of topics and current events. Authors are faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft columns that adhere to journalistic best practices and Associated Press style...
This source is a digitilized map from Atlas of Texas. It was published by the University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Business Research 1976. It is found in the Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection.
The Texas Politics Project regularly interviews current and former political journalists, newsmakers, and political actors in order to capture a comprehensive set of contemporary, first person accounts of Texas political history. The project also engages in a range of educational initiatives including maintaining an online Texas politics textbook, offering an online course in Texas politics that meets the state's...
The words "Mexican immigration" are usually enough to start a vibrant, politically and emotionally charged debate. Yet, the history of Mexican migration to the U.S. involves a series of ups and down—some Mexicans were granted citizenship by treaty after their lands were annexed to the U.S., and, until the 1970s, they were considered legally white—a privilege granted to no other group. At the same time, Mexicans...
In the century and a half since the war's end, historians, politicians, and laypeople have debated the causes of the U.S. Civil War: what truly led the Union to break up and turn on itself? And, even though it seems like the obvious answer, does a struggle over the future of slavery really explain why the south seceded, and why a protracted military struggle followed? Can any one explanation do so satisfactorily?...
After the chaos of the American Civil War, Congress and lawmakers had to figure out how to put the Union back together again–no easy feat, considering that issues of political debate were settled on the battlefield, but not in the courtroom nor in the arena of public opinion. How did the defeated South and often vindictive North manage to resolve their differences over issues so controversial that they had torn the...
Former US Representitive talks about John F. Kennedy's final vist to Fort Worth before his death.  This is a three part series of videos.
Read the following newspaper article about presidential visits to Fort Worth and the excerpt from the John Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum about President Kennedy’s visits to Fort Worth.
Analyze, individually or with a partner. the following political cartoons that appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in November 1963 by answering the following questions.
On May 29, 1964 the United States Post Office issued a commemorative stamp for President John F. Kennedy. On that day, JFK would have been forty-seven years old. Upon the death of a president, the USPS issues a stamp, usually on his birthday. It is cancelled from a town that was significant to his life. JFK’s stamp was cancelled from what was considered his "hometown," Boston, Massachusetts. The envelope, or cover,...
Analysis of the Map of President Kennedy’s Motorcade Route in Fort Worth, Texas November 21- 22, 1963
Analyzing Political Speeches: Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy Words matter and the words of the Presidents of the United States are especially important because our President serves as a symbol of the nation. From the first presidential speech to the last, the words of Presidents have the potential not only to shape policy but also to unite, challenge, and inspire citizens. A president’s first...
President John F. Kennedy and the Citizens of Fort Worth, Texas In the fall of 1963, President John F. Kennedy began to prepare for his second presidential campaign. By the end of September, he had traveled to the West, speaking in nine different states in less than a week. In November he planned a tour of Texas, a "must win" state, visiting five cities over two days. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy...
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