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This is an interactive guide that includes descriptions for all of the programs and educator resources available by the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in a printable format. For more information please contact Education Coordinator Elaina Cunningham at 651-2258 or ecunningham@pphm.wtamu.edu
This is an "All things considered" episode pertaining to the debate surrounding the Confederate flag and the legacy of slavery in the United States with particular focus in the Texas debates, especially those revolving around certain textbooks that 5 million students began to use as of August 2015.
Through archeology, archival records, and oral history, the Ransom and Sarah Williams farmstead project has revealed the story of one African American family’s transition from slavery to freedom. In a larger sense it represents thousands of other African American families whose stories cannot be told.
This lesson contains three mini-lessons that may be used independently or together. In these lessons, students will explore a painting based on an actual farmstead site owned by former slaves, Ransom and Sarah Williams, to learn about African-American family life in 19th-century Texas. They will work in pairs or groups to learn about the various activities and chores shown in the painting, examine the artifacts...
Material objects found at historical sites can be both intriguing and informative, especially when examined carefully in the classroom with students. A thorough discussion of any given artifact can be based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, a classifying device used to illustrate the hierarchy of thinking levels, from simple and concrete to complex and abstract. Analyzing artifacts from the Ransom Williams farmstead using Bloom'...
Students will learn what Freedom Colonies were and identify Texas Freedom Colonies on a map. Students will work in cooperative groups to research positive and negatives aspects of African-American life after slavery within the Freedom Colonies.
Students will explore a variety of county government records to learn how Ransom Williams, an African American living in post-Civil War, Texas, began the transition to freedom by exercising the right to vote and own property. Students will work with partners to analyze a 19th-century primary source document, then create their own county government documents and answer questions about Ransom Williams and the...
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
The historical map collection has over 28,000 maps and images online. The collection focuses on rare 18th and 19th century North American and South American maps and other cartographic materials.
Lesson plan to explore the roles of a variety of people who lived or worked at a nineteenth-century Texas frontier fort or in a nearby frontier town and to reach a greater understanding of life on the Texas frontier by choosing a character and writing in his/her voice.
Students compare ancient inventions such as the atlatl, spear point and bow and arrow with modern ones, such as the telephone. Students make inferences about how inventions change lives based on a cause and effect chart.
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