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A World War II program traded German and Italian Americans for Americans who were trapped abroad. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Jan Jarboe Russell.
This is an interactive guide that includes descriptions for all of the programs and educator resources available by the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in a printable format. For more information please contact Education Coordinator Elaina Cunningham at 651-2258 or ecunningham@pphm.wtamu.edu
This is an "All things considered" episode pertaining to the debate surrounding the Confederate flag and the legacy of slavery in the United States with particular focus in the Texas debates, especially those revolving around certain textbooks that 5 million students began to use as of August 2015.
The story of the Santa Rita No. 1 is a lesson on dreams coming true because of tenacity and not giving up. The Permian Basin discovery marked the beginning of the West Texas oil boom. Because the well was on univerisity land, both UT and A and M have financially benefitted from royalties sine 1923. Cynthia Jordan visits children throughout the state of Texas, telling the Santa Rita story with music and song. For you...
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Days of Dust" is a continuing Texas Panhandle-wide Community Engagement effort surrounding Ken Burns' film The Dust Bowl, which premiered on KACV and all PBS stations November 18 and 19, 2012. "Days of Dust" key partners include Amarillo College, Amarillo Independent School District, Amarillo Museum of Art, Amarillo Public Library, KACV - Public Television for the Texas Panhandle, Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum...
A great source of content for teachers.At the time of its inception, the United States was the only functioning democracy in the world. However, this does not mean the founders created the American ideal of freedom ex nihilo. As Dr. Fears argues, they drew on the Old Testament, Greece, Rome, Christianity, and the English tradition of liberty to create a political order of democracy, divided power, and individual...
A great source of content for teachers.Only five men signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Why? Dr. Fears argues that the American Revolution was fought for limited government and low taxes, but the Constitution is a charter for a strong national government with broad power to tax. Despite the anxieties of men like Patrick Henry, the Constitution has aided the cause of liberty through...
A great source of content informaiton for teachers.The Revolutionary War delivered the colonists from English rule, but it did not result in effective governance. Financial crisis, disunity, and a dysfunctional system of confederation threatened to undo the achievements of independence. But this crisis called forth, in the Constitutional Convention, a group of statesmen who were willing to compromise to save the...
A great source of content for teachers.The story of freedom in the United States cannot be told without the Declaration of Independence. Dr. Fears explains what the stirring first paragraph of the Declaration meant to Americans in 1776 and what we’ve lost since then. But freedom is not only freedom from British rule. It must also be freedom to participate in the political system and to choose one’s own way of life....
Great resource for teacher knowlege and content.From the Louisiana Purchase onward, American settlers extended into the frontier what Jefferson called “the Empire of Liberty.” In this lecture, Dr. Fears tells the story of the Texan war of independence from Mexico. A recurring theme in this series is the necessity of courage and sacrifice in defense of freedom. Dr. Fears reiterates the importance of courage and honor...
Guide your students in answering difficult questions about ownership of land and how the Red River War changed the lives of the Southern Plains tribes.
Windmills were not only important water sources for livestock, farming and pioneers, but water was necessary for the railroad to cross the Texas Panhandle. Early trains required steam to run their engines. Windmills pumped water into water tanks located along the tracks which provided the water for the needed steam. The trains enabled the population to grow quickly in the Panhandle.
The Red River War (1874-75) was the culmination of the years of conflict between the Texas Plains Indians, the Texans, and the U.S. Military. From this military campaign the Indians were placed on reservations and the Texas Panhandle was opened up to expansion. This area was one of the last in Texas to open to Anglo settlers.
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
People have lived in the Texas Panhandle for the past 14,000 years. In this lesson, students will become engaged with the people of the past by learning who they were, how they met their most basic needs and what the evidence they left behind tells us about their lives.
The historical map collection has over 28,000 maps and images online. The collection focuses on rare 18th and 19th century North American and South American maps and other cartographic materials.
W. D. Smith Commercial Photographywas Fort Worth's leading commercial photographer during the mid- to late-20th century. This digital collection contains over 150 photographic negatives taken by the company during the 1940s-1950s as well as numerous 19th century Texas photographs collected by W.D. Smith  
Birds and Watchers by Jessie Maye Smith is a website to read about the birds of North Texas in the Fort Worth Telegram newspaper columns written by bird enthusiast Jessie Maye Smith. Her weekly column, which ran from 1953 to 1974, chronicles the winged wild life of Fort Worth and Tarrant County. 
The Tejano Voices Project focuses on one hundred seventy six oral history interviews with Tejano and Tejana leaders from across the state conducted by Dr. Jose; Angel Gutiearrez, associate professor of political science at the University of Texas at Arlington. These interviews were conducted in 1992-2006, and emphasize the personal stories and struggles of the interviewees, many of whom are the first individuals of...
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