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A World War II program traded German and Italian Americans for Americans who were trapped abroad. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Jan Jarboe Russell.
This is an article on the history of the illegal slave trade in Texas. At the turn of last century Eugene C. Barker, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin, conducted research on the illegal slave trade in Texas and sought to unveil the obscure history of slave smuggling in the state. Examine these unique primary sources.
This is an interactive guide that includes descriptions for all of the programs and educator resources available by the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in a printable format. For more information please contact Education Coordinator Elaina Cunningham at 651-2258 or ecunningham@pphm.wtamu.edu
This is an "All things considered" episode pertaining to the debate surrounding the Confederate flag and the legacy of slavery in the United States with particular focus in the Texas debates, especially those revolving around certain textbooks that 5 million students began to use as of August 2015.
What role did Texas play in the American revolution? (What–Texas? It wasn’t even a state yet!) And yet, Spain and its empire–including what is now the Lone Star State, did play a role in defeating the British Empire in North America. New archival work is lending light on the ways that Spain, smarting from its loss of the Floridas to Britain in the Seven Years War, backed the American colonists’ push for independence.
The story of the Santa Rita No. 1 is a lesson on dreams coming true because of tenacity and not giving up. The Permian Basin discovery marked the beginning of the West Texas oil boom. Because the well was on univerisity land, both UT and A and M have financially benefitted from royalties sine 1923. Cynthia Jordan visits children throughout the state of Texas, telling the Santa Rita story with music and song. For you...
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Days of Dust" is a continuing Texas Panhandle-wide Community Engagement effort surrounding Ken Burns' film The Dust Bowl, which premiered on KACV and all PBS stations November 18 and 19, 2012. "Days of Dust" key partners include Amarillo College, Amarillo Independent School District, Amarillo Museum of Art, Amarillo Public Library, KACV - Public Television for the Texas Panhandle, Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum...
This episode looks at US perceptions of Mexico through map making during the US / Mexico War. This talk will discuss in detail a number of maps that were published in the US, mostly New York between 1846 and 1850. Some of them were reissued annually to reflect ongoing progress in the Mexican-American war, but historians and military analysts alike have ignored them until recently. Guest Chloe Ireton looks at how...
Guide your students in answering difficult questions about ownership of land and how the Red River War changed the lives of the Southern Plains tribes.
Windmills were not only important water sources for livestock, farming and pioneers, but water was necessary for the railroad to cross the Texas Panhandle. Early trains required steam to run their engines. Windmills pumped water into water tanks located along the tracks which provided the water for the needed steam. The trains enabled the population to grow quickly in the Panhandle.
The Red River War (1874-75) was the culmination of the years of conflict between the Texas Plains Indians, the Texans, and the U.S. Military. From this military campaign the Indians were placed on reservations and the Texas Panhandle was opened up to expansion. This area was one of the last in Texas to open to Anglo settlers.
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
People have lived in the Texas Panhandle for the past 14,000 years. In this lesson, students will become engaged with the people of the past by learning who they were, how they met their most basic needs and what the evidence they left behind tells us about their lives.
By the early autumn of 1862, Americans were reconciled to the fact that the military struggle to determine the fate of the Union was going to be a long and bloody one. Intense fighting was reflected in lengthy casualty lists printed in newspapers, and the names of small towns and rural communities where battles took place became burned into American collective memory: Manassas, Shiloh, Malvern Hill. The grim task of...
As students and faculty members resume their classwork at Garrison Hall this semester, it is worth examining Garrison Halls colorful history and architectural conception. The first stages of Garrisons development began in 1922 as the Board of Regents sought a new campus plan for the university. Although the Board had been employing the eminent New York City architect Cass Gilbert—whose achievements include the U.S....
Since its inception, Not Even Past has dedicated itself to the idea that historians and history students aren’t the only ones capable of writing and enjoying history. The University of Texas at Austin’s Physics Department has proven us right with the release of its new website “University of Texas at Austin: Physics Department History.” The website, created by Emeritus Professor Melvin Oakes, offers a remarkable...
Article about the McDonald Observatory and the National Science Foundation by David A. Conrad, professor at the University of Texas at Austin.
At the annual meeting of the Texas State Historical Association in March 2011, the luncheon for Women in Texas History was dedicated to Liz Carpenter. Among the remarks and remembrances, Michael L. Gillette, the Executive Director of Humanities Texas, offered a wonderful tribute based on materials and photographs from the LBJ Library & Museum at UT Austin. We were so impressed by the talk that we asked Mr....
This photograph captures a 1943 family outing to The University of Texas, in Austin. The young father, Fred Wong, was a grandson of one of Pershings "Chinese"--a group of 527 Chinese who accompanied General John J. Pershing into the United States after the failure of his campaigns against General Francisco Pancho Villa in 1917. Villa threatened retaliation against the Chinese for aiding Pershing, who determined to...
If you cross the Colorado River at Redbud Trail and look upstream toward Tom Miller Dam, there amid the tumbled rocks you can still see the wreck of Austins dream. In 1890, the citizens of Austin voted overwhelmingly to put themselves deeply in debt to build a dam, in hopes that the prospect of cheap waterpower would lure industrialists who would line the riverbanks with cotton mills. Austin would become the Lowell...
At the Republican presidential debate on September 7, Texas Governor Rick Perry surprised many listeners by responding to a question about the scientific evidence for global climate change by referring to the seventeenth-century century Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei. After claiming that the science is - is not settled on climate change, Perry went to say that The idea that we would put...
Setting aside large tracts of land for preservation and public use was a unique idea in the late nineteenth-century United States as the country focused on westward expansion and development. However, rather than moving to protect land untouched by human hands, the creation of the National Park System includes stories of people already using these spaces in a variety of ways. In 1872, the world’s first...
Austins moonlight towers have long been a distinctive part of the citys landscape, their lights casting a gentle glow on the streets 165 feet below. Though Austins fifteen surviving towers are now the last of their kind, this form of street lighting was once common across the United States; in fact, Austin acquired its towers secondhand from Detroit, which in the 1890s had the most extensive such system in the world.
It’s no secret that the Texas Legislature faces a daunting budget problem, with deficits estimated to be as little as $15 billion or as much as $27 billion or more. Constitutionally speaking, however, the actual deficit is about $4.3 billion. That’s the difference between what was appropriated for the 2010-2011 biennium and the revenue the Comptroller of Public Accounts says is now available to pay for it. According...
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