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One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This collection contains materials from John Goodwin Tower, a Southwestern alumnus, represented Texas in the United States Senate from 1961 through 1984. Before his retirement, he named Southwestern University as the official repository for his papers. The approximately 800 linear feet of materials primarily reflect his Senate activities and include documents, legislative files, correspondence, speeches, campaign...
This collection contains roughly 70 interviews of Baytown residents which reflect the history of Baytown. This collection was created between 1968 to the early 1980s. The Baytown Oral History Collection includes stories on the following Texas topics: History of the Humble Oil & Refinery Co., Hurricane Carla, the Great Depression, a Baytown Lynching, History of (Middletown) Pelly, History of Baytown’s...
This collection consists of approximately 100 interviews of Baytown veterans who served in wars and during peacetime. These stories highlight experiences from World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and Operation Desert Storm.
This is a collection of oral histories from Baytown College consisting of 20 oral histories of World War II veterans which was done as part of a fiftieth anniversary of World War II by Barbara Cooper and her History students in the mid-1990s
A World War II program traded German and Italian Americans for Americans who were trapped abroad. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Jan Jarboe Russell.
KXAS was the first television station in Texas and the Southwest when it signed on as WBAP-TV on September 27, 1948. It is an NBC owned station in Fort Worth which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Presented by the UNT Archives, this collection features photographs, video, and scripts from news stories produced by the station during its early years.
This is an interactive guide that includes descriptions for all of the programs and educator resources available by the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in a printable format. For more information please contact Education Coordinator Elaina Cunningham at 651-2258 or ecunningham@pphm.wtamu.edu
This is an "All things considered" episode pertaining to the debate surrounding the Confederate flag and the legacy of slavery in the United States with particular focus in the Texas debates, especially those revolving around certain textbooks that 5 million students began to use as of August 2015.
The Portal to Texas History and their companion site Resources 4 Educators offer My Texas History Notebook lessons, designed to engage students through activities and group-oriented projects. The activities include creating maps, conducting debates, and role playing. Some of the lessons bridge contemporary issues with historical events, such as the lessons Branches of State Government and Immigration to Texas.
Comparing the American and Texas Revolutions enables the students to understand the similarities and differences of these two historic conflicts.
Four generations of photographers – all named Byrd Williams – documented more than 100 years of North Texas history with their work. Now, UNT Libraries has acquired their collection, consisting of over 10,000 prints and 300,000 negatives. The materials include commercial and studio photography, western landscapes, documentary studies, and fine art photography. Family correspondence, artifacts, and a collection of...
The Danish Heritage Preservation Society contributes their collection of over 300 photographs to the Portal. The images date back to the 1800's and portray a variety of events, organizations, people, and places that relate to the Danish culture in Texas.
During the Great Depression Connie Ford McCann served as a company clerk for two six-month tours in the Civilian Conservation Corps. This collection, presented by the UNT Archives, features his diary, documents, and photographs from his year with the CCC.
When Hardin-Simmons University opened in 1892 sixty students enrolled at the small college in the fledgling town of Abilene. At that time it was called Abilene Baptist College as it had been founded by the Sweetwater Baptist Association and a group of cattlemen and pastors who wanted to bring Christian higher education to the west. Renamed Simmons College for the New York preacher whose financial support allowed the...
The Boys Scouts of America asked the UNT Digital Libraries Division to digitize a full run of Scouting Magazine to celebrate the magazine’s centennial anniversary. Reading through 100 years of issues provides an interesting reflection of social and political changes in the country. The magazine helped promote rationing and victory gardens during both World Wars and encouraged assisting the poor during the Depression...
Primary and secondary teachers will especially appreciate the Texas Folklife Festival collection belonging to the University of Texas at San Antonio’s Institute of Texan Cultures. More than 4,000 photographs capture traditional customs, foodways, and folk dancing of a range of ethnic groups in Texas that include the Czech-Moravians, Lebanese, Koreans, Poles, Germans, Scandinavians, Mexican Americans, Irish, and...
With the generous support of the Amon Carter Foundation, the UNT Libraries completed their latest, large-scale digitization project titled Texas Cultures Online, which features more than 16,000 historical items that showcase Texas’ diverse cultural heritage. Seventeen institutions, consisting of large and small public libraries, universities, private family collections, museums, and historical societies participated...
The story of the Santa Rita No. 1 is a lesson on dreams coming true because of tenacity and not giving up. The Permian Basin discovery marked the beginning of the West Texas oil boom. Because the well was on univerisity land, both UT and A and M have financially benefitted from royalties sine 1923. Cynthia Jordan visits children throughout the state of Texas, telling the Santa Rita story with music and song. For you...
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Days of Dust" is a continuing Texas Panhandle-wide Community Engagement effort surrounding Ken Burns' film The Dust Bowl, which premiered on KACV and all PBS stations November 18 and 19, 2012. "Days of Dust" key partners include Amarillo College, Amarillo Independent School District, Amarillo Museum of Art, Amarillo Public Library, KACV - Public Television for the Texas Panhandle, Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum...
Guide your students in answering difficult questions about ownership of land and how the Red River War changed the lives of the Southern Plains tribes.
Windmills were not only important water sources for livestock, farming and pioneers, but water was necessary for the railroad to cross the Texas Panhandle. Early trains required steam to run their engines. Windmills pumped water into water tanks located along the tracks which provided the water for the needed steam. The trains enabled the population to grow quickly in the Panhandle.
The Red River War (1874-75) was the culmination of the years of conflict between the Texas Plains Indians, the Texans, and the U.S. Military. From this military campaign the Indians were placed on reservations and the Texas Panhandle was opened up to expansion. This area was one of the last in Texas to open to Anglo settlers.
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
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