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Through the analysis of primary-source archival footage from TAMI’s interactive web exhibit, “Weathering Texas,” students will demonstrate an understanding of extreme weather events in Texas during the 20th and 21st centuries. Teachers will take students in grades 3 - 8 on a “guided tour” of “Weathering Texas,” where students will explore the historical context of certain events and the conditions that made them...
TAMI is happy to release its newest lesson plan, Texas in Transition: Social, Political, and Economic Issues in 1920s Texas. Completely free and full of primary source materials, Texas in Transition uses a project-based learning approach to improve retention of new content and develop students’ personal ties to the past. Accompanying worksheets and an annotated list of resources for additional research are also...
This lesson explores this unique period of growth in the U.S. space program focusing on the role of the Manned Spacecraft Center (now the Johnson Space Center) and the contributions of workers at the Texas site. Using films produced by NASA and staff at the Manned Spacecraft Center, as well as home movies and other promotional films, students will gain a greater understanding of the developments within the space...
The lumber industry has played a key role in the economic development of Texas since the end of the Civil War. Timber production in East Texas was partially responsible for the rapid growth of railroads in the state, as well as the development of the Texas paper industry and the rise of both residential and commercial building. However, jobs in the lumber industry have been considered as some of the most hazardous...
This lesson plan is sponsored by the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. In the 1950s and 1960s in the United States, national support and funding for space programs and technological research expanded as the international political climate following World War II gave way to the Cold War. Often referred to as the “Space Race,” the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for supremacy in spaceflight...
There are many ways that people learn about their past, their culture, and their traditions. While much of this knowledge can be gained through books, history and culture can also be passed down through experiences and personal records. One such record that can teach more about the past is the home movie. Home movies enable the engaged observer to learn about ways of life from the not-so-distant past. Styles,...
Through the analysis of primary source archival footage from TAMI’s online exhibit, “When Texas Saw Red,” students will demonstrate an understanding of the Cold War period that spanned nearly half a century. Students will explore the politics of the atomic bomb and the policy of containment, propagated paranoia related to the spread of communism, the nuclear arms race and détente, as well as the fall of the Berlin...
Through the analysis of primary source archival footage from TAMI’s online exhibit, “When Texas Saw Red,” students will demonstrate an understanding of the Cold War period that spanned nearly half a century. Students will explore the politics of the atomic bomb and the policy of containment, propagated paranoia related to the spread of communism, the nuclear arms race and détente, as well as the fall of the Berlin...
For students to become competent researchers and writers, they must understand the distinct differences between primary and secondary sources, which are the building blocks of effective historical research. Many students, including those in higher education, do not understand the importance of varied, accurate primary and secondary sources when conducting research to support valid arguments. This issue inspired our...
Through the use of primary and secondary source audiovisual materials, students will examine and trace the history and experiences of Mexican-Americans in the Southwest and Texas from the sixteenth to twentieth century. Students will understand how the Mexican-American experience ties to indigenous and Spanish culture by examining the impact of European colonization and settlement on native people in the seventeenth...
Through the use of primary and secondary source audiovisual materials, students will examine and trace the history and experiences of Mexican-Americans in the Southwest and Texas from the sixteenth to twentieth century. Students will understand how the Mexican-American experience ties to indigenous and Spanish culture by examining the impact of European colonization and settlement on native people in the seventeenth...
Using educational films from the 1960s and 1980s, students will examine the varied experiences of the nineteenth century Texas Empresarios, and identify the important contributions of significant individuals, including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, Baron de Bastrop, Martín de León, and Green DeWitt. This film is a valuable resource that was saved through the Texas Archive of the Moving Image’s digital...
Using educational films from the 1960s and 1980s, students will examine the varied experiences of the nineteenth century Texas Empresarios, and identify the important contributions of significant individuals, including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, Baron de Bastrop, Martín de León and Green DeWitt. This film is a valuable resource that was saved through the Texas Archive of the Moving Image’s digital preservation...
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image's new lesson plan uses primary source films about notable Texas landmark, with footage to present the history and geography of landmarks such as the Alamo, the Mission at Yselta, Liendo Plantation, Falcon Dam, Spindletop, the Governor's Mansion, and the San Jacinto Monument, among others. Students will use the lesson to research and develop a presentation about an additional...
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image's new lesson plan for grade 4 and grade 7 uses educational films from the 1960s and 1980s to examine the varied experiences of the nineteenth century Texas Empresarios and identify the important contributions of significant individuals, including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, Baron de Bastrop, Martín de León and Green DeWitt. The lesson highlights the Mexican settlement and...
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image's new lesson plan for grade 4 and grade 7 uses primary and secondary source audiovisual materials to examine and trace the history and experiences of Mexican-Americans in the Southwest and Texas from the sixteenth to twentieth century. The lesson plan uses archival footage to encourage students' understanding of how the Mexican-American experience ties to indigenous and Spanish...
Through the use of a primary source video of the 1977 National Women’s Conference, students will see democratic principles in action and learn about important Texas and national women leaders and the political process. Students will evaluate different political arguments and articulate differing opinions on the Equal Rights Amendment.
By watching and analyzing primary source video, students will learn about notable Texas women, including Ann Richards, Barbara Jordan, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, and Liz Carpenter. Students will analyze speeches and actions in the films to achieve a better understanding of government terminology and civic engagement.
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Students will be introduced to 8 notable 20th century Texans through the use of primary source video. Students will then research and develop a presentation about an additional 20th century Texan mentioned in the TEKS.Texans included: Denton Cooley, Michael DeBakey, Horton Foote, J. Frank Dobie, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. Gonzalez, Oveta Culp Hobby, Barbara Jordan, and Lyndon B. Johnson.
Guide your students in answering difficult questions about ownership of land and how the Red River War changed the lives of the Southern Plains tribes.
Windmills were not only important water sources for livestock, farming and pioneers, but water was necessary for the railroad to cross the Texas Panhandle. Early trains required steam to run their engines. Windmills pumped water into water tanks located along the tracks which provided the water for the needed steam. The trains enabled the population to grow quickly in the Panhandle.
The Red River War (1874-75) was the culmination of the years of conflict between the Texas Plains Indians, the Texans, and the U.S. Military. From this military campaign the Indians were placed on reservations and the Texas Panhandle was opened up to expansion. This area was one of the last in Texas to open to Anglo settlers.
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
People have lived in the Texas Panhandle for the past 14,000 years. In this lesson, students will become engaged with the people of the past by learning who they were, how they met their most basic needs and what the evidence they left behind tells us about their lives.
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