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The Portal to Texas History and their companion site Resources 4 Educators offer My Texas History Notebook lessons, designed to engage students through activities and group-oriented projects. The activities include creating maps, conducting debates, and role playing. Some of the lessons bridge contemporary issues with historical events, such as the lessons Branches of State Government and Immigration to Texas.
Comparing the American and Texas Revolutions enables the students to understand the similarities and differences of these two historic conflicts.
Educational trunks are loaded with touchable artifacts, photographs, books and a Teacher’s Guide. Trunks are loaned out for 4 days on a first-call, first-served basis. Teachers are responsible for picking up the trunk before 5:00 pm on Friday and returning the trunks no later than 5:00 pm the following Thursday. The trunk is portable, fitting in most vehicles. The teacher who receives the trunk is responsible for...
Guide your students in answering difficult questions about ownership of land and how the Red River War changed the lives of the Southern Plains tribes.
Windmills were not only important water sources for livestock, farming and pioneers, but water was necessary for the railroad to cross the Texas Panhandle. Early trains required steam to run their engines. Windmills pumped water into water tanks located along the tracks which provided the water for the needed steam. The trains enabled the population to grow quickly in the Panhandle.
The Red River War (1874-75) was the culmination of the years of conflict between the Texas Plains Indians, the Texans, and the U.S. Military. From this military campaign the Indians were placed on reservations and the Texas Panhandle was opened up to expansion. This area was one of the last in Texas to open to Anglo settlers.
Early Texas Panhandle people lived close to water sources such as the Canadian River and its tributaries. In order for the area to open up, a way had to be found that would bring water to the people rather than people going to the water. In the late 1890's the windmill became the answer. Water was found underground and the windmill could pump it to the surface. This lesson plan takes your students back in time when...
People have lived in the Texas Panhandle for the past 14,000 years. In this lesson, students will become engaged with the people of the past by learning who they were, how they met their most basic needs and what the evidence they left behind tells us about their lives.
For the Annotated Map of the Civil War students will work together in groups to complete an annotated map showing Texas's role in the Civil War, while investigating the roles of Texas soldiers, women, unionist, government, the economy, and the Blockade of the South.  Students will discuss battles in Galveston, Sabine Pass, Palmito Ranch, and Brownsville.  For a processing activity students will write a...
Students will examine William B. Travis letter of 24 February 1836 along with several nineteenth century documents detailing the siege of the Alamo. These sources represent how Texans and Americans perceived the events at the Alamo. This PSA allows learners to examine the siege of the Alamo using period documents and early histories from the late 1800s.
Federalism and the State's Response to Disaster requires students to demonstrate an understanding of federalism by focusing on real-word issues and current events. Students will analyze pressing issues to determine which governmental entity is responsible.
The Civil War was a key turning point in both American and Texas History. Texans suffered shortages of food and other goods due to the blockade. At no other time have emotions run so high or so much been at stake for ordinary Texans. Students will will analyze songs, photographs, and newspapers from the Civil War to identify examples of social, political or economic events and their impact on life in Texas.
Livestock including cattle was first introduced to Texas when Spaniards were colonizing Texas. After the westward expansion American cowboys modeled their own type of branding. Students in this lesson will analyze pictures and answer questions using the slide show to find out more about the cattle branding and its history. Using a Venn diagram they will record the similarities and differences between American and...
Immigration to Texas: Then and Now requires students to demonstrate an understanding of immigrant groups, demographics, and settlement patterns. Students' through interactive video, powerpoint slideshow and online newspaper links will learn about Immigration to Texas. They will create a Flipbook to showcase their findings and present to the class.To conclude they will take a look at Current Issues for...
The Civil War was the result of differences between the North and South. Among the main issues were expansion of slavery into the territories, the South's declining political power, states rights, and the retention of slavery.In this lesson students will research the key events that lead to the Civil War. They will use the power point slides and embedded newspaper links to access the online newspapers to learn...
The early 20th Century was an era of economic growth, reform and prosperity. Many progressives as they called themselves worked to make American society a better and safer place to live. In this lesson students will use "human statues" to learn about "monuments" and how they can come to represent an ideology. They will identify the important leaders of the Progressive movement and their impact on...
 In the early nineteenth century changing social conditions and the idea of equality led to the beginning of the Womens Suffrage movement. Women were participating in reform movements and taking an increased interest in politics. Why women were not allowed to vote was questioned.Using online newspapers and permalinks embedded in Powerpoint slides students will learn about the Suffrage Movement, and its role in...
The Galveston Hurricane of the 1900's was described as the worst disaster of the Century. In the span of one twenty four hour it is estimated at least ten thousand persons were swept away by the wind and waves.Using online newspapers and embedded links in powerpoint slides students will learn about the Galeveston storm of the 1900's and its impact.
Ranching has been a major Texas industry for nearly three centuries.In the 1830s the men who came to Texas were primarily farmers and not ranchers, but they quickly saw the significance of lush pastures where cattle could thrive with minimum so many became cattle raisers. Through online newspapers and embedded permalinks in each powerpoint slide, students will learn about the Cattle Kingdom and its importance to...
Cotton was first grown in Texas by Spanish missionaries. San Antonio missions in 1745 produced several thousand pounds of cotton, annually which was spun and woven by mission craftsmen.In this lesson students will view several online newspapers and follow the permalinks embedded in each powerpoint slide, to learn about Cotton Farming and its importance to Texas.
The Pony Express was a mail delivery system from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California. It operated from April 3, 1860 to October 1861. It became the most direct means of east-west communication before the telegraph.
North American Indian tribes displayed incredible diversity in their cultures, living conditions and modes of sustenance. Texas Indians likewise showed great variety, ranging from nomadic hunter-gatherers to sedentary agriculturalists.This Primary Source Adventure illustrates the diversity of Texas Natives through the observations of the first United States Indian Agent in the region, a U.S Army officer, and an...
Excerpts from John Duval’s book are introduced to examine events pertaining to the failed Mier Expedition. As a direct participant in these events Wallace’s account brings them into stark reality.Published in the fall of 1870 this remains one of the few contemporary sources written about this incident and the only one to detail the life of "Big Foot" Wallace.
Quanah Parker was the last Chief of the Comanches his tribe roamed over the area where Pampas stands. Son of Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker a white girl taken captive during the raid of 1863 on Fort Parker, Texas.In this lesson students will view online newspapers and follow the permalinks embedded in each powerpoint slide, to learn about the Quanah Parker and identify and explore the important issues of this...
Why was Cavalry equipment so important? Learn what it meant to be a soldier at the turn of the century, and why good horse riding skills were necessary, while examing detailed illustrations of what it took to saddle up.
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