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Texas Storytime is a program organized by Humanities that promotes childhood literacy and the support of parents and caregivers. The program partners with community libraries across the state and features works from Texas authors that celebrate the diverse cultures around the state. The program will occur for six weeks at the Centennial Branch of the Midland County Public Library beginning February 8,...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
Lonesome Dove, a new traveling exhibition created by the Wittliff Collections at the Alkek Library, Texas State University, and presented in partnership with Humanities Texas features fifty-five framed and matted sepia tone photographs of the Lonesome Dove miniseries, which first aired on CBS in 1989. This miniseries is based off Lonesome Dove- Larry McMurty’s epic novel of two...
 This exhibition combines photographs taken of farmers and families by the Farm Security Administration during the dustbowl with compelling interviews taken by Bill Ganzel with survivors to discuss the daily lives, trials, and tribulations these men and women faced during the Dust Bowl.The Dust Bowl is an exhibition organized by the Nebraska Council for the Humanities in collaboration with Humanities...
 Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate, which opened at the Smithsonian Institution in 2003, includes informative text provided by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. Veteran White House journalist Helen Thomas conducted interviews with ten of the senators, which have been distilled into two audio presentations. A photography-based video presentation...
Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. This exhibition is available in wall-hanging and abridged freestanding versions. Vaquero is an exhibition created by the Wittliff Collections at the Alkek Library, Texas State University...
A traveling photo exhibition that uses real photos from early Texas settles to examine the daily struggles and development of Texan community and lifestyles.  The Way Things Were is an exhibition by Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This exhibition is available for rental with current bookings shown on the link below.
Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads. This exhibition is available for rent, with current bookings...
Based on the book Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas and on an earlier exhibition of the same name by the Woman's Collection at Texas Woman's University Library, this freestanding exhibition uses archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, cards, and texts to display the struggle for woman suffrage in Texas. Citizens at Last is made possible in part by a We the...
Alamo Images: Changing Perceptions of a Texas Experience surveys the Alamo of the Texas imagination through illustrations drawn from historical documents, paintings, sketches, cartoons, comic books, television, and film. Alamo Images focuses, not merely on Texas history, but on the mythic power of events that helped define a community, state, and nation.This exhibition is organized by the...
Through twenty panels of photographic images and captions, Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence presents an expanded look at these fifty-nine extraordinary men who brought modern Texas into being. Signers is an exhibition by Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.This exhibition is available for rental with current bookings shown at the link...
Do you know an outstanding teacher in your school or community? Nominate him or her for one of our 2017 Outstanding Teaching Awards, sponsored by Humanities Texas. In 2017, we will present a total of fifteen awards to exceptional Texas teachers, including the Outstanding Teaching of the Humanities Award, the Linden Heck Howell Outstanding Teaching of Texas History Award, and the Award for Outstanding Early-Career...
Manuel F. Medrano, historian and Humanities Texas board member, explores the influence of accordionist Valerio Longoria and conjunto music in the Rio Grande Valley, painting a vivid picture of community and celebration inspired by the genre. A thirty-minute documentary on Valerio Longoria, For a Quarter a Song, is made available online by the Los del Valle Oral History Project. El ensayo también se encuentra aquí en...
El Paso Trails, Saving Some Bison...
This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine...
This program aims to preserve the legacy of the Buffalo Soldiers by providing enriching outdoor and cultural experiences to all Texans. The program hosts a variety of exciting cultural events in regions all across Texas. Texas Buffalo Soldiers bring history to life with stories, costumes and tools.  This program is a travel program, check the website for dates and locations near you.
American Prisoners of War" includes compelling firsthand narratives from World War II POWs Robert Preston Taylor, Rufus W. Smith, and Roy Maxwell Offerle; World War I POW Pat O'Brien; Vietnam War POW Congressman Sam Johnson; and Andersonville prisoner Prescott Tracy, as well as resources on American prisoners of the Korean War and a selection of POW-related film and radio documentaries. Most of the veterans featured...
In the 1920s, writer Winifred Sanford's stories of the Texas oil boom captured the anxieties of a state on the verge of modernization. Born in Minnesota, Sanford moved to Wichita Falls in 1920, as her husband sought his fortune in the new oilfields of North Texas. At first, Sanford found the small town stifling. But she soon realized the oil boom made Texas more complex than it had first seemed. Swift change made...
Acclaimed singer and actress Etta Moten Barnett was born in Weimar, Texas, in 1901. By the age of ten, she was singing in the choir of her father’s church. Thirty-three years later, at the invitation of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, she became the first African American woman to sing at the White House. Barnett's career led her to Hollywood, where she appeared in films such as Busby Berkeley's Gold Diggers of 1933...
Karle Wilson Baker was Texas's most celebrated poet in the first half of the twentieth century. Born in Arkansas in 1878, she moved to Nacogdoches in her early twenties and soon fell under the spell of her adopted state, writing about the role of Texans in the American drama. Her collection of poems Dreamers on Horseback was nominated for the 1931 Pulitzer Prize. Texas Originals is also available on iTunes!...
In the early 1880s, a young African American boy in Texarkana named Scott Joplin was trained in the fundamentals of classical music and opera by his German-born teacher. Born near Linden, Joplin was the son of a former slave—and a budding musical talent. By his early twenties, he left home to become an itinerant musician. While living in St. Louis, Joplin encountered a kind of music that juxtaposed a steady,...
Librarian and historian Nettie Lee Benson rose from a bookish South Texas childhood to assemble one of the world’s leading archives for research on Latin America. Born in 1905, Benson grew up on a family farm outside Sinton, not far from Corpus Christi, and earned her undergraduate degree from The University of Texas at Austin. In 1925, she took a teaching job in Monterrey. There, as she later explained, she “drank...
The singer who first performed the song "Ol' Man River" is an obscure figure today. Baritone Julius Bledsoe was among the first African Americans to appear on Broadway, but he made few recordings and his fame was soon eclipsed by the great Paul Robeson, who succeeded him in the role of Joe in the classic musical Show Boat. A critic from the New York Morning Telegraph described him as "a singer who can pick the heart...
Wilderness and Wildflowers: The Legacy of Lady Bird Johnson is an exhibition created by the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center to honor the former first lady and celebrate the centennial year of her birth. Now available through the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program, Wilderness and Wildflowers highlights Mrs. Johnson's adventurous spirit and deep commitment to the preservation and beautification of the...
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