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After the Civil War, Confederate veterans turned to the state government to provide pensions for their services. Dr. Randolph "Mike" Campbell explains the Confederate pension system in Texas. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Dr. Randolph "Mike" Campbell traces the process that Dora Shaw went through while applying for a pension as a widow of an African American Confederate veteran. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
After the Civil War, Confederate veterans turned to the state government to provide pensions for their services. Dr. Randolph "Mike" Campbell explains the Confederate pension system in Texas. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Dr. Randolph "Mike" Campbell uses primary research to tell the story of Guy Shaw, an African American who lived in Harrison County and received a Confederate veterans' pension. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Join TSHA Chief Historian Randolph “Mike” Campbell as he reveals an untold story he uncovered while researching for his book, A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas 1850-1880. “Texas Confederate Veteran Pensions: The Curious Cases of Guy and Dora Shaw of Harrison County,” focuses on the complex race relations in East Texas following the Civil War. Dr. Campbell uses primary archival sources to tell...
Following the Civil War, race relations in east Texas were complicated. Dr. Randolph "Mike" Campbell offers insight into how these relationships are viewed. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Dr. Emilio Zamora and Dr. Andrés Tijerina discuss the background of the Handbook of Tejano History project and their work with the Texas State Historical Association. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Several officer quarters are still standing at For McKavett State Historic Site. Cody Mobley, Site Manager, shares the history of the Officer’s Quarters, which were first constructed in 1852 and finished by 1856. He also explains that the Commanding Officer's Quarters served as a hotel, a boarding house, and a private residence. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Cody Mobley, Site Manager of Fort McKavett State Historic Site, examines the structures where most of the support activities at the Fort took place. Among the structures still standing are the Schoolhouse, the Hospital, and the Stone Quarry. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th United States Infantry, and the barracks were constructed by 1853. Cody Mobley, Site Manager of Fort McKavett State Historic Site discusses Barracks #4, the Non-Commissioned Officer's Barracks, and the ruins of the Long Barracks. The fort barracks are preserved as they would have looked during the 19th century. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State...
Cody Mobley, Site Manager of Fort McKavett State Historic Site, shares the history of the fort. Founded on March 14, 1852, the fort housed the federal military, including elements of the 4th Infantry, all four regiments of the Buffalo Soldiers, and the 10th Infantry among others. Video courtesy of Texas Talks and the Texas State Historical Association.
This is the full webinar of Bill O'Neal's Texas Talk From the Alamo to San Jacinto. State Historian of Texas Bill O’Neal focuses this Texas Talk on two key battles of the Texas Revolution: the battle of the Alamo and San Jacinto. He expands on these two battles that became the most notable during the Texas Revolution. He provides a fascinating talk on historical figures and heroes of the Texas Revolution. Bill O’...
The portrait of Bernardo de Galvez hangs in Congress today. Bernardo de Galvez was voted the eighth honorary citizen of the United States due to his tremendous courage and assistance to the Americans in the American Revolution.
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
Dr. McCaslin presents "Mending Fences: The Marqués de Rubí in 1767 and the Spanish in Texas." After King Carlos III of Spain appointed the Marqués de Rubí as the inspector of frontier presidios and commissioned him to remedy economic abuses and other urgent matters, Rubí began his inspection of the Spanish presidios in July 1767. He visited a number of missions and presidios in Texas before leaving in 1767. In all,...
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, a vocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk, such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville, she met a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune from steam boating but was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He became one of the richest ranchers behind Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin married in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela Vidal Kenedy, who became the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in the census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appeared that her children were born...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decided to move her family to New Orleans which she sold her ranch property to do. By 1845, Patricia returned to Texas and her children scattered. Many became involved in court battles....
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who had 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. The location of the colony created political issues and discord, as it was surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commissioner and was in charge of assigning land to...
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