header image
One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This is a digitized collection of articles on Dr. May Owen, past president of various medical institutions including the Texas Society of Pathologists, the Tarrant County Medical Society, and the Texas Medical Association dating from 1912-2003. These are collected in the the Portal to Texas History, an online database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The articles are provided by the Texas Medical...
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
This is a map of Mexico and Texas from 1828, housed at the Texas General Land Office in Austin, Texas. The full citation to find the map is the following: Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico, Segun lo organizado y definido por las varias actas del Congreso de dicha Republica: y construido por las mejores autoridades, New York: White, Gallaher, and White, 1828, Map #93846, Holcomb Digital Map Collection, Archives...
This primary source is a map and part of the Texas 175: A Dozen Documents That Made a Difference, an online exhibition featured by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This map of Texas from 1836 shows not only the geography of the new nation, but the location of Indian tribes and villages and herds of of wild horses, cattle, and buffalo. News of the Texas Revolution caused a sensation among people back...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is an in depth article on the generous donation of $25,000 by the Texas Society, Daughters of the American Revolution (TSDAR) for the conservation of Stephen F. Austin’s Registro, or Register of the Old 300, and several other related land grant documents from the Archives of the Texas General Land Office. The article explains that: Under the leadership of State Regent Joy Dabney Hagg, the TSDAR helped conserve...
This is a primary resource found at the Texas General Land Office. It is a map of the North America circa 1776. This is a copper-engraving map that shows all of North America, except for the undetermined far northwest, plus Central America and the top of South America, and the West Indies. The “XIII United States” are named on the map, and there is a table designating the ownership of the various lands and islands....
This is a primary resource. It is a map found at the Texas General Land Office in the General Map Collection. The Map was donated by Katherine Staat in memory of Herbert Christian Merillat. The map's full title is: "A New Map of North America with the West India Islands divided according to the preliminary Articles of Peace, signed at Versailles, 20 Jan. 1783."
This is a newspaper article on the North Texas Masonic Historical Museum and Library located on the first floor of the Plano Masonic Lodge. It provides a brief history of the building, its beginnings and what it represents for the community and for Texas at Large. The article is also calling for assistance in the restoration and preservation of the historic building that houses the museum.
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
This is a primary document of John Mitchell's oath of office. John Mitchell was one one of the first African American to be elected to the Texas House of Representatives. African Americans in Texas experienced the right to vote for the first time between February 10–14, 1868. After the 11th Texas Legislature met in 1866 and refused to pass the amendments abolishing slavery and granting citizenship to African...
This is a primary document. It is the Oath of Office document of Richard Allen, one of Texas' first African American Legislator. Richard Allen (1830–1909) was born enslaved in Richmond, Virginia, and arrived in Harris County with slave owner J. J. Cain in 1837. As a young man, Allen gained a solid reputation for construction and engineering work, and designed and helped to build the impressive Houston mansion of...
The Hood’s Brigade, 5th Texas Regiment, Company I Muster Roll, 1862-1864, contains an original copy and photocopy of the 4-page muster roll for Company I of the Fifth Texas Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade. The muster roll contains a list of members with rank and casualty record while the regiment was under the command of Confederate officer Jerome B. Robertson. This collection was processed by Chester V....
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, avocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument in this very interesting webinar.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville she meets a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune off steam boating and was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He becomes one of the richest ranchers next to Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin marry in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela, who becomes the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in a census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appears that her children were born throughout...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decides to move her family to New Orleans. She sold her ranch property to do this. By 1845 Patricia returns to Texas and her children scatter. Many get involved in court battles. Many...
avatar-url