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One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
This article is a secondary source on the flag makers of the Texas Revolution.
This book, includes transcriptions of original documents containing Mexican Col. Juan N. Almonte's 1834 report concerning the measures necessary to prevent the loss of Texas, as well as fifty of his letters, and the journal he kept while at the side of Santa Anna during the Texas rebellion in 1836. This book is part of the collection entitled: Texas State Historical Association Monographs and was provided by Texas...
This is a map of Mexico and Texas from 1828, housed at the Texas General Land Office in Austin, Texas. The full citation to find the map is the following: Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico, Segun lo organizado y definido por las varias actas del Congreso de dicha Republica: y construido por las mejores autoridades, New York: White, Gallaher, and White, 1828, Map #93846, Holcomb Digital Map Collection, Archives...
This is primary document part of the online exhibit Texas 175: A Dozen Documents That Made a Difference featured by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This is an online copy of the original letter written by William Barrett Travis from the Alamo on February 24, 1836. At the Alamo in San Antonio, then called Bejar, 150 Texas rebels led by William Barret Travis made their stand against Santa Anna's...
This primary source is part of the exhibit Texas 175: A Dozen Documents that Made a Difference featured online by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This original color design sketch by Peter Krag shows the flag and seal for the Republic of Texas. It was approved on January 25, 1839, and signed on the top by Mirabeau Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas; John M. Hansford, Speaker of the Texas...
This is a primary source that is part of the online exhibit of Texas 175: A Dozen Documents that Made a Difference. This is a letter written by Sam Houston and is held at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Historians still debate Sam Houston's strategy in taking the Texan army on a retreat eastward towards Louisiana rather than engaging immediately with Santa Anna's troops after the Battle of the Alamo...
This primary source is a map and part of the Texas 175: A Dozen Documents That Made a Difference, an online exhibition featured by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This map of Texas from 1836 shows not only the geography of the new nation, but the location of Indian tribes and villages and herds of of wild horses, cattle, and buffalo. News of the Texas Revolution caused a sensation among people back...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is an in depth article on the generous donation of $25,000 by the Texas Society, Daughters of the American Revolution (TSDAR) for the conservation of Stephen F. Austin’s Registro, or Register of the Old 300, and several other related land grant documents from the Archives of the Texas General Land Office. The article explains that: Under the leadership of State Regent Joy Dabney Hagg, the TSDAR helped conserve...
This is a primary resource found at the Texas General Land Office. It is a map of the North America circa 1776. This is a copper-engraving map that shows all of North America, except for the undetermined far northwest, plus Central America and the top of South America, and the West Indies. The “XIII United States” are named on the map, and there is a table designating the ownership of the various lands and islands....
This is a primary resource. It is a map found at the Texas General Land Office in the General Map Collection. The Map was donated by Katherine Staat in memory of Herbert Christian Merillat. The map's full title is: "A New Map of North America with the West India Islands divided according to the preliminary Articles of Peace, signed at Versailles, 20 Jan. 1783."
This is a compilation of primary sources, mainly early Texas History Maps, organized by the Texas General Land Office. The Texas General Land Office is proud to announce the donation of three more historic maps to our Archives. These maps, donated by Ms. Katherine Staat in memory of her uncle Chris Merrillat, augment our collection of 45,000 maps and sketches and enhance the GLO Archives — one of the premier...
This newspaper article highlights how conservation experts, including A&M archaeologists have been working in conserving and restoring the LeBelle, the French Shipwreck discovered off the waters of Matagorda Bay in 1995. The article emphasises that the discovery brought to light 1.6 million artifacts from the ship and that currently the ship is now reassembled at the Bob Bullock State History Museum in Austin.
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
The Benson Latin American Collection and the Office of the Director of the Univeristy of Texas Libraries have jointly created this Collections Highlight online exhibition. This exhibition highlights Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's memoirs during his final exile in Havana in 1872. Sometimes referred to as “the Napoleon of the West,” Santa Anna — who served as president of Mexico in multiple, non-consecutive terms — is...
The Hood’s Brigade, 5th Texas Regiment, Company I Muster Roll, 1862-1864, contains an original copy and photocopy of the 4-page muster roll for Company I of the Fifth Texas Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade. The muster roll contains a list of members with rank and casualty record while the regiment was under the command of Confederate officer Jerome B. Robertson. This collection was processed by Chester V....
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, avocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument in this very interesting webinar.
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