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Mexican Heart Patient Operation by DeBakey & Baylor: Press conference following a successful procedure using the DeBakey pump on a heart patient, Mrs. Esperanza del Valle Vasquez, from Mexico City. The DeBakey pump, built by Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Rice University, and the Methodist Hospital in Houston, was used to take over part of the heart's workload following surgery while the patient was fitted for two...
KHOU-TV Film Box 6902, Reel 2 : footage from February to April, 1969: Cooley on Heart - Cost, Date: "04/06/69": Dr. Cooley discusses the cost of creating an artificial heart following the first implant of such a device. This film reel contains short segments on news events in the Channel 11 viewing area, mostly within the city of Houston. The segments were filmed prior to the news show, and the anchorperson would...
The full length episode on Audie Murphy by the Biography Channel. Video is 43 minutes long.
A Biography Video on the Death of World War II Hero, Audie Murphy.
A video clip from the Documents of Truth Series on World War II hero, Doris Miller
A short promo video about the Heroic Doris Miller from Waco, Texas
Produced by Jim Ruddy and presented by the Shell Companies Foundation and the Texas Committee for the Humanities, The Texas Experience presents the history of Texas through a series of one-minute clips. Each clip features a celebrity narrator briefly exploring a specific aspect of Texas history or culture, with topics ranging from early women settlers to Buddy Holly's short but influential career. In this episode,...
In December 1984 and February 1985, Michael L. Gillette, then director of the LBJ Library's Oral History Program, conducted his only two video interviews with Lady Bird Johnson in the dining room at her home on the LBJ Ranch. Though the interviews were recorded to accompany an LBJ Library exhibition, A White House Diary, most of this footage has not been seen by the public. In the excerpt featured, Mrs. Johnson...
Spanish explorer Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca first set foot on land that would become Texas in 1528, when his crude raft ran aground near Galveston Island. The raft held survivors of an ill-fated Spanish expedition to settle Florida. Cabeza de Vaca then embarked upon what one scholar described as "the most remarkable [journey] in the record of American exploration." He lived for several years among Texas Indians,...
As a public official, suffragist, and educator, Annie Webb Blanton devoted her life to women's rights. She said, "Everything that helps to wear away age-old prejudices contributes towards the advancement of women and of humanity." Born in Houston in 1870, Blanton pursued a career in teaching to demonstrate her independence. After graduating from The University of Texas in 1899, she worked at Denton's North Texas...
The words "Mexican immigration" are usually enough to start a vibrant, politically and emotionally charged debate. Yet, the history of Mexican migration to the U.S. involves a series of ups and down—some Mexicans were granted citizenship by treaty after their lands were annexed to the U.S., and, until the 1970s, they were considered legally white—a privilege granted to no other group. At the same time, Mexicans...
The story of the Santa Rita No. 1 is a lesson on dreams coming true because of tenacity and not giving up. The Permian Basin discovery marked the beginning of the West Texas oil boom. Because the well was on univerisity land, both UT and A and M have financially benefitted from royalties sine 1923. Cynthia Jordan visits children throughout the state of Texas, telling the Santa Rita story with music and song. For you...
A series of videos available from the Texas Forestry Museum, which include videos about Texas Forests.
In the century and a half since the war's end, historians, politicians, and laypeople have debated the causes of the U.S. Civil War: what truly led the Union to break up and turn on itself? And, even though it seems like the obvious answer, does a struggle over the future of slavery really explain why the south seceded, and why a protracted military struggle followed? Can any one explanation do so satisfactorily?...
After the chaos of the American Civil War, Congress and lawmakers had to figure out how to put the Union back together again–no easy feat, considering that issues of political debate were settled on the battlefield, but not in the courtroom nor in the arena of public opinion. How did the defeated South and often vindictive North manage to resolve their differences over issues so controversial that they had torn the...
A great source of content for teachers.At the time of its inception, the United States was the only functioning democracy in the world. However, this does not mean the founders created the American ideal of freedom ex nihilo. As Dr. Fears argues, they drew on the Old Testament, Greece, Rome, Christianity, and the English tradition of liberty to create a political order of democracy, divided power, and individual...
A great source of content for teachers.Only five men signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Why? Dr. Fears argues that the American Revolution was fought for limited government and low taxes, but the Constitution is a charter for a strong national government with broad power to tax. Despite the anxieties of men like Patrick Henry, the Constitution has aided the cause of liberty through...
A great source of content informaiton for teachers.The Revolutionary War delivered the colonists from English rule, but it did not result in effective governance. Financial crisis, disunity, and a dysfunctional system of confederation threatened to undo the achievements of independence. But this crisis called forth, in the Constitutional Convention, a group of statesmen who were willing to compromise to save the...
A great source of content for teachers.The story of freedom in the United States cannot be told without the Declaration of Independence. Dr. Fears explains what the stirring first paragraph of the Declaration meant to Americans in 1776 and what we’ve lost since then. But freedom is not only freedom from British rule. It must also be freedom to participate in the political system and to choose one’s own way of life....
Great resource for teacher knowlege and content.From the Louisiana Purchase onward, American settlers extended into the frontier what Jefferson called “the Empire of Liberty.” In this lecture, Dr. Fears tells the story of the Texan war of independence from Mexico. A recurring theme in this series is the necessity of courage and sacrifice in defense of freedom. Dr. Fears reiterates the importance of courage and honor...
This 93-video home movie collection spanning from 1968-76 comes from the family of Dr. Thomas F. Freeman and documents his career as a professor and debate coach at prestigious Houston universities, his home life, and his service as a minister at Houston’s Mt. Horem Baptist Church.
This episode looks at US perceptions of Mexico through map making during the US / Mexico War. This talk will discuss in detail a number of maps that were published in the US, mostly New York between 1846 and 1850. Some of them were reissued annually to reflect ongoing progress in the Mexican-American war, but historians and military analysts alike have ignored them until recently. Guest Chloe Ireton looks at how...
Mildred Didrikson Zaharias, nicknamed "Babe" for her childhood prowess on the baseball diamond, dominated women's sports from the 1930s through the '50s. She was born in 1911 in Port Arthur, Texas, and quickly became known as not just a gifted athlete, but a fierce competitor in every arena she entered. Though best remembered for her accomplishments in golf and track and field, she also excelled in...
Born in Galveston in 1894, King Wallis Vidor grew up with the movies. Over the course of his career, he directed both silent and sound films and worked with many of Hollywood's top stars, from Charlie Chaplin to Audrey Hepburn. Vidor began his career in film as a teenager, working as a projectionist in a Galveston theater. His first hit came in 1925, with The Big Parade, the highest grossing silent film of all...
William Barret Travis was only twenty-six years old when he died defending the Alamo. He came from Alabama just five years before, in 1831, leaving behind a failed career and marriage. Texas, a land he came to love, gave Travis a new life—and an early death. Travis clashed with authorities in Anahuac shortly after arriving in Texas, feuding over Mexico's antislavery laws. He spent two months in prison and...
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