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Winegarten discusses the importance of women in the auxiliary units and Colonel Hobbys roles during World War II. Oveta was honored for her service and later appointment to the presidential cabinet, the second woman to ever hold that position. She became the secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare during the time of the polio vaccine’s approval, which Winegarten discusses with viewers. Lastly, she discusses the...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's life after she met governor Hobby. She explains how Oveta was brought in to the WWII efforts and got women involved. Oveta moved to D.C. to run the Women’s’ Interest Bureau for the Army. As more men are drafted, women were looked at more and more for help. Oveta was asked to draw up a plan for a women’s army unit and eventually asked to run it. Winegarten reveals a number of challenges...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's early childhood in Killeen, Texas and her experience working with her father in the Texas legislature. Her father was an attorney and served in the Texas state legislature. Her mother was a suffragist. Oveta’s name is an Iroquois word for forget; however, Winegarten discusses why Oveta was one of the most unforgettable women in Texas history. By age 20 she was the youngest...
Winegarten introduces the viewers to the early life of Oveta Culp Hobby, who grew from a precocious child in Killeen, Texas to an Army colonel, presidential cabinet member, and owner of a media empire in Houston.
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, a vocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk, such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville, she met a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune from steam boating but was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He became one of the richest ranchers behind Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin married in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela Vidal Kenedy, who became the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in the census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appeared that her children were born...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decided to move her family to New Orleans which she sold her ranch property to do. By 1845, Patricia returned to Texas and her children scattered. Many became involved in court battles....
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who had 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. The location of the colony created political issues and discord, as it was surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commissioner and was in charge of assigning land to...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia de Leon's life. Patricia donates her entire dowry to her husband to purchase land for what becomes the de Leon colony in Texas at the beginning of the 19th century. She gives birth to ten children who live through Mexican Independence in Mexico and Texas. The family returns to live in Mexico during the time of the Battle of Medina in Texas, which was devastating for many families and...
Dr. Crimm's full Texas Talks on two Tejano women: Patricia de Leon and Petra Vela Kenedy, recorded in December 2015, contrasts these women's experiences in 19th century Texas. Patricia de la Garza de Leon was born in 1775 from a prominent Mexican family. She inherited a fortune from her father, which she used, along with her empresario husband, Martin de Leon’s money earned from the sale of livestock to establish...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Galvez as the governor of New Orleans, detailing his marriage and family, as well as, his military successes in the region.
Dr. Crimm discusses the military experiences of Galvez, who as a young lieutenant was assigned to Chihuahua. He was charged with defeating the Apache in this desolate region and inspired his men to bravery. Galvez learned the meaning of command in Mexico. He also met and defeated the Apache, taking many captive. Back in Chihuahua, instead of punishing them, Galvez learned their language and spoke to them. He...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Bernardo de Galvez, the outcome of the Louisiana Purchase, and the governance of Louisiana by Spain.
Dr. Crimm discusses the Galvez family, including the life of Bernardo’s uncle Jose de Galvez, who came from humble beginnings and left an enduring contribution to history through his influence on the Bourbon monarch Spain’s King Charles III. Crimm also discusses the role of Creoles in New Spain, who eventually lead to Mexico's independence from Spain.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions and answers after her talk on November 2, 2015 on Bernardo de Galvez. She discusses his treks to the Pacific, how he funded and smuggled supplies to the Americans during the Revolutionary War, the legacy of Galvez in Mexico and the first cattle drive from Texas to Louisiana.
On November 2, 2015, Dr. Caroline Castillo Crimm presented “Bernardo de Galvez and the Impact of the American Revolution on Texas.” Galvez is the namesake for Galveston Island and he was a governor, general, and viceroy of Mexico. During his lifetime, his family was one of the most distinguished in the royal service of Spain. Following family tradition, Bernardo chose a military career. Before Spain entered the...
McCaslin discusses the importance of the Marqués de Rubí's inspection and subsequent recommendations for ruling the area in the 18th century, advising much of the area in Texas to be abandoned.
On October 14, 2015, Dr. Rick McCaslin discussed the regulation of the presidios in Texas after the Marqués de Rubí's inspection of the territory.
Dr. McCaslin sets the stage to discuss the Spanish Empire and the Marqués de Rubí's task to inspect and make recommendations to the King about Spain's northern territory in Texas and across the southwest in the 18th century.
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