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Historian Carlos Castañeda changed how we think of the Southwest. He told the story of the Texas-Mexico borderlands as one of shared culture and heritage, rather than conflict and division. Raised in Brownsville, Castañeda earned his doctorate from The University of Texas at Austin in 1932. He served there as professor and librarian for the rest of his life. In his 1928 book The Mexican Side of the Texan Revolution...
People come from around the world to view the American art in Fort Worth's Amon Carter Museum. Works by Frederic Remington and Charles Russell, acquired by Carter, form the heart of the collection. Carter didn’t live to see his grand museum, but he didn’t build it for himself. He built it for his fellow citizens, especially those in his beloved city of Fort Worth. Carter was born in 1879 in tiny Crafton, Texas, near...
Scholar and folklorist John Mason Brewer was born in Goliad in 1896. Over his fifty-year career, Brewer almost single-handedly preserved the African American folklore of his home state. Brewer's grandfathers were wagoners who hauled dry goods across Texas. His father worked as a cowboy, traveling to the Indian Territories and Kansas. The stories they shared fostered Brewer's love of folk tales, while his mother,...
Though Billy Lee Brammer's novel The Gay Place is a work of fiction, it remains one of the most revealing accounts of Texas politics ever written. Brammer was born in Dallas in 1929. He earned a degree in journalism from the University of North Texas, then worked as an editor for the Texas Observer before moving to Washington to serve as an aide to then-Senator Lyndon Johnson. The Gay Place, which takes its title...
With a bent back and powerful hands, an African American man figures prominently in a large mural in Houston's Blue Triangle YWCA. To his left, Harriet Tubman leads weary slaves to freedom. To his right, Sojourner Truth stands while children march proudly into a schoolhouse. Dedicated in 1953, this mural—titled The Contribution of Negro Women to American Life and Education—was a milestone in the career of artist...
According to J. Frank Dobie, the writer and naturalist Roy Bedichek "liked to cook outdoors, eat outdoors, sleep outdoors, look and listen outdoors, [and] be at one . . . with the first bob-whiting at dawn." Bedichek was born in 1878 and raised on a farm south of Waco, where he absorbed the sights, sounds, and rhythms of the blackland prairie. He spent the majority of his professional career as director of the state...
Stephen F. Austin wrote, "I have learned patience in the hard School of an Empresario." That was six years after Austin brought his first settlers to Texas. Colonizing Texas would become his life's work, but without his patience and years of sacrifice, Texas as we know it today might not exist. Austin came to Texas in 1821 to continue his father's work. Moses Austin received permission to bring Anglo colonists into...
William Barret Travis and James Butler Bonham were born in what is now Saluda County. These two men fought and died at the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas. We will look back to their South Carolina roots and see how they found themselves becoming heroic defenders of the Alamo.Bonham and Travis both practiced law and made stops in Alabama prior to arriving to Texas. Travis found himself in joint command of The Alamo in...
Today, every adult American citizen regardless of race, gender, religion or socio-economic background has the opportunity to vote. The dreams of our founding fathers, propounded by action, gave us the right to change, the right to be heard, and the right to vote. However, this was not always so. To remind us of our civic duty, Vote America! educates students about the heroic efforts made for equality and democracy;...
Former US Representitive talks about John F. Kennedy's final vist to Fort Worth before his death.  This is a three part series of videos.
Seven restored films from the Orris Brown Collection at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center, featuring rare footage of the 1935 Houston flood, President F.D. Roosevelt's visit to the San Jacinto monument, Sam Houston's former slave and later servant Jeff Hamilton, and 1930s advertisements for Houston-based businesses.
Texas Entertainment News was created by media producer Fred Miller in 1996. Hosted by Tom McConnell and Leisa Hart (of Total Fitness "Buns of Steel" fame), its goal was to provide a weekly look into entertainment production and events throughout Texas. Airing on Sunday nights at 10:30pm, it was anchored at WFFA in Dallas and carried by 15 affiliates statewide. In addition to the television broadcast, TEN had an...
Houston Arts and Media is dedicated to creating innovative ways of teaching children and adults about history, science, literature and the world. The Ham Slice of History is one of many tools we have created to make learning a little local history easy and entertaining. This You Tube Channel features a selection of the Houston Arts and Media's video collection. 
Lyndon Johnson was the first president to appoint an African American to the Supreme Court when, on June 13, 1967, Johnson named Thurgood Marshall, the great-grandson of a slave, to sit on the highest court in the land. Lyndon Johnson exploited his mastery of the legislative process to shepherd a collection of progressive programs, rivaling those of New Deal, through Congress with astounding success. However,...
The U.S. Congress votes to annex Texas. Mexico, which has never recognized Texas as an independent republic, protests this action, and its Minister to the U.S., Juan Almonte, breaks off diplomatic relations with the United States.
After a failed diplomatic mission, U.S. President Polk orders American troops to cross the Nueces River into disputed territory along the border of Texas and Mexico. This further inflames the conflict between the U.S. and Mexico 
After Santa Annas forces rout the Texans at the Alamo and Goliad, Sam Houstons army defeats the Mexicans at the Battle of San Jacinto. Later, the Texans and the Americans will regard this as the birth of the independent republic of Texas, but Mexico will continue to claim Texas as its territory.
Mexico opens up Texas to American immigrants, leading to a flood of new English-speaking settlers in the territory. Later, these Americans will be led by Sam Houston into a revolt against Mexico and President Antonio Lopéz de Santa Anna. 
Calvert Nevaquaya plays traditional Comanche flute music.  
Many of the ranching terms used today are derived from Spanish, Mexican and indigenous words. These words come from the animals and tack of the cowboy trade, along with cultural items such as food and clothing. Below are common words or phrases, along with audio clips illustrating correct pronunciation.  
They had a Dream Too: Young Leaders of the Civil Rights Movementis an 11th and 12th grade curriculum project. This project was produced by the Texas Young Lawyers Association (TYLA) and made possible by a grant from the Texas Bar Foundation. They Had a Dream Too: Young Leaders of the Civil Rights Movementconsists of a 28 minute film highlighting the achievement of a few of the thousands of young...
Willie Nelson reading William B. Travis' "Victory or Death" Letter (To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World) wrote at the Alamo, The link will take you to Grooveshark. You should be able to stream the audio file for free, or you have to option to purchase the recording. It comes from Willie Nelsons album, Texas in my soul (Track 7).
The Tejano Voices Project focuses on one hundred seventy six oral history interviews with Tejano and Tejana leaders from across the state conducted by Dr. Jose; Angel Gutiearrez, associate professor of political science at the University of Texas at Arlington. These interviews were conducted in 1992-2006, and emphasize the personal stories and struggles of the interviewees, many of whom are the first individuals of...
In this video, The First Lady Anita Perry talks about the Texas Governor's Mansion, including the history of the mansion, the contents of the mansion, former Governor's who lived intheMansion, and ends with the arson of the mansion and the resoration efforts that have been put in place to repare the home. 
Podcast: Once separated from Mexico, political issues in the United States kept Texas from becoming a state, forcing it to govern itself as an independent republic. Additionally, many in Texas wanted the new country to expand to the Pacific Ocean and become a rival to the United States. Sam Houston maneuvered Texas into statehood and went on to serve as one of its first two U.S. senators, and later its governor.
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