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The Heritage Society at Sam Houston Park has recently released a short video documenting the accomplishments of Ninfa Laurenzo. Ninfa Laurenzo, with the support of her husband and family, popularized fajitas in Tex-Mex restaurants and set numerous other trends in Houston food culture during the 20th century. Later in life, Laurenzo became very active in Texas politics. HAM slice #47 traces Laurenzo's life and legacy...
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image has recently released The Henry Kuempel Collection. The Texas Archive of the Moving Image received the films as a donation from the Austin History Center. The collection consists of the home movies shot by Kuempel, Texas resident, from the 1940s and 1950s. The films show a glimpse of the final days of Austin street cars, the early days of Round Up celebrations at the University...
A podcast series produced by Stevie Ray Vaughn in Conjunction with the Bullock Museum which examines the history and development of Vaughn’s own signature musical style as well as the musical culture of Texas
Graduate students in the UT History Department’s Public History seminar led by Joan Neuberger examined documents in local archives and wrote a collection of historical essays on key aspects of that day’s events, as well as on the historical context, and the aftermath. In this episode, Neuberger discusses the project with four of those students: Itza Carbajal, Maria Hammack, Rebecca Johnston, and John Lisle.
Admiral Chester Nimitz was assigned as commander-in-chief of the Pacific Fleet following the Pearl Harbor attack. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer elaborate on the life of Admiral Nimitz that prepared him for the role, including his childhood in Fredericksburg, Texas.
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
Winegarten discusses the importance of women in the auxiliary units and Colonel Hobbys roles during World War II. Oveta was honored for her service and later appointment to the presidential cabinet, the second woman to ever hold that position. She became the secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare during the time of the polio vaccine’s approval, which Winegarten discusses with viewers. Lastly, she discusses the...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's early childhood in Killeen, Texas and her experience working with her father in the Texas legislature. Her father was an attorney and served in the Texas state legislature. Her mother was a suffragist. Oveta’s name is an Iroquois word for forget; however, Winegarten discusses why Oveta was one of the most unforgettable women in Texas history. By age 20 she was the youngest...
Winegarten introduces the viewers to the early life of Oveta Culp Hobby, who grew from a precocious child in Killeen, Texas to an Army colonel, presidential cabinet member, and owner of a media empire in Houston.
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
TAMI is proud to present its newest web exhibit, LA FRONTERA FLUIDA (THE FLUID BORDER). The Texas borderlands are an exceedingly varied and evolving space, one of perpetual conflict and social tension, bi-national negotiation and cooperation, and rich cultural diversity and heritage. At a time when issues like immigration and border security are of increasing political prominence, we must take a closer look at the...
This is a lecture sponsored by Humanities Texas and published online in July 2016. David Oshinsky’s lecture was funded by the Pulitzer Prize Centennial Campfires Initiative in observance of the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize. The lecture was delivered as part of Humanities Texas's 2016 "Post-War America, 1945–1960" teacher institute in Austin. Who could have imagined that Ron Chernow's fine...
This is an article that includes a report and video published by the Houston Chronicle Newspaper on Tuesday June 7, 2016 on the legacy of Barbara Jordan. The video depicts live footage of Barbara Jordan speaking at the 1976 Democratic National Convention in Madison Square Garden. She was the first African American woman to deliver a keynote address at a major party convention.
This is a 60 minute documentary that highlights Texas National Parks. This film will help Texans celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. The film celebrates the culture, history, wildlife and natural wonders preserved at each site, and is organized chronologically by date of creation. Big Bend National Park, which opened in 1944 and covers more than 800,000 acres of prickly desert, canyons and...
Winegarten takes questions from the audience after her webinar presentation on Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby.
Winegarten discusses women’s importance in the auxiliary units and Colonel Hobby roles during World War II. Oveta was honored for her service and later appointment to the presidential cabinet, the second woman to ever hold that position. She became the secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare during the time of the polio vaccine’s approval, which Winegarten discusses frankly with viewers. Lastly, she discusses...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's life after she meets governor Hobby. She explains how Oveta was brought in to the WWII efforts and how women became involved. She moves to D.C. to run the Women’s’ Interest Bureau for the Army. As more men are drafted, women are looked at to help more. Oveta was asked to draw up a plan for a women’s army unit and eventually asked to run it. Winegarten explains how history from today and...
Winegarten discusses Oveta's early childhood in Killeen, Texas and her experience working with her father in the Texas legislature. Her father was an attorney and in the Texas state legislature. Her mother was a suffragist. Oveta’s name is discussed, which is an Iroquois word for forget; however, Winegarten discusses why Oveta was one of the most unforgettable women in Texas history. By age 20 she was the youngest...
Winegarten introduces the viewers to the early life of Oveta Culp Hobby, who grew from a precocious child in Killeen, Texas to an Army colonel, presidential cabinet member, and owner of a media empire in Houston.
"I was the first. Vote for Me!" is an interactive website that brings to life the important firsts in United States and Texas history who are part of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards for Texas elementary students. This website allows students to explore 21 animated historical figures who made significant contributions, paving the way to today. After viewing the animations, students vote on...
The Texian Heritage Festival's YouTube Channel is the official channel for the Texian Heritage Festival. Here you'll find a wide range of videos from previous festivals as well as promotional videos about upcoming events.
In commemoration of the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution, Director Michael Cerny completed a series of sixty-second stories presented by well-known Texans that recall the many exceptional accomplishments made by other Texans. Enjoy this clip featuring Dallas native Owen Wilson as he recounts the life of "Blind" Willie Johnson, a gospel blues singer and guitarist. Made by Michael Cerny.
In commemoration of the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution, Director Michael Cerny completed a series of sixty-second stories presented by well-known Texans that recall the many exceptional accomplishments made by other Texans. Enjoy this clip featuring Alvin native Nolan Ryan, former Major League Baseball pitcher as he relates the very personal story of how something "Made in Texas" launched a Hall of Fame...
In commemoration of the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution, Director Michael Cerny completed a series of sixty-second stories presented by well-known Texans that recall the many exceptional accomplishments made by other Texans. Enjoy this clip featuring Midland native Laura Bush as she shares the remarkable story of George Dawson, who learned to read at 98.
Yes you heard right. Summer supports renewable energy. Its the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution and director Michael Cerny has shot a film series of 21 small Texas history clips.Summer -- who is a San Antonio native -- celebrates the development of Wind energy in Texas.
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