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James Harkins from the Texas General Land office presents an early photographic map of Austin in 1887 and a map used by Stephen F. Austin during the Mexican National period. Harkins explains the way in which maps were used by empresarios to advertise to settlers.  Harkins also explains the way in which maps demonstrate change over time.
This Texas Talk aired on Monday August 15, 2016 by the Texas State Historical Association. Fort McKavett was established in 1852 by the 8th US Infantry. The fort closed briefly in 1859, but reopened in 1869 and has been designated a Texas historic site since May 17, 1968. The fort is considered one of the most intact and preserved examples of Texas-Indian Wars military post. The fort has restored structures that...
Listen as the accounts of 7 former slaves are brought to life through the voices of talented local actors. These recordings make up just a portion of the full stories recalled by James Grumbles, Marry Anne Patterson, Rosina Hoard, Sallie Johnson, Sallie Wroe, Sam Mason, and William Owens. Today their full recollections and those of 63 other former slaves from Austin and Travis County can be found at the Austin...
This is a fun short and informative documentary on the history of Texas by the History Channel. The documentary talks about the following: Spanish missionaries were the first European settlers in Texas, founding San Antonio in 1718. Hostile natives and isolation from other Spanish colonies kept Texas sparsely populated until following the Revolutionary War and the War of Mexican Independence, when the newly...
This is a video where Patrick Ettinger talked about his book, "Imaginary Lines: Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, 1882-1930", in which he shares the origins of immigrant smuggling and illicit entry on the northern and southern U.S. borders from 1882-1930, at a time when English, Irish, Chinese, Italian, Russian, Lebanese, Japanese, Greek, and, later, Mexican migrants created various “...
Frank Reaugh (1860–1945) is one of the Southwest's earliest and most distinguished artists. Working in the vein of American Impressionism, Reaugh (pronounced "Ray") devoted his career to visually documenting the immense unsettled regions of the Southwest before the turn of the twentieth century. A restless and intrepid traveler, Reaugh sketched scenes while riding with cattlemen during the height of Texas's historic...
"I was the first. Vote for Me!" is an interactive website that brings to life the important firsts in United States and Texas history who are part of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards for Texas elementary students. This website allows students to explore 21 animated historical figures who made significant contributions, paving the way to today. After viewing the animations, students vote on...
The Texian Heritage Festival's YouTube Channel is the official channel for the Texian Heritage Festival. Here you'll find a wide range of videos from previous festivals as well as promotional videos about upcoming events.
In commemoration of the 175th Anniversary of the Texas Revolution, Director Michael Cerny completed a series of sixty-second stories presented by well-known Texans that recall the many exceptional accomplishments made by other Texans. Enjoy this clip featuring North Richland Hills native Logan Henderson (Big Time Rush) as he recounts the history of the wild mustangs, who were once living symbols of the old west.
In the early 1880s, a young African American boy in Texarkana named Scott Joplin was trained in the fundamentals of classical music and opera by his German-born teacher. Born near Linden, Joplin was the son of a former slave—and a budding musical talent. By his early twenties, he left home to become an itinerant musician. While living in St. Louis, Joplin encountered a kind of music that juxtaposed a steady,...
As a public official, suffragist, and educator, Annie Webb Blanton devoted her life to women's rights. She said, "Everything that helps to wear away age-old prejudices contributes towards the advancement of women and of humanity." Born in Houston in 1870, Blanton pursued a career in teaching to demonstrate her independence. After graduating from The University of Texas in 1899, she worked at Denton's North Texas...
The words "Mexican immigration" are usually enough to start a vibrant, politically and emotionally charged debate. Yet, the history of Mexican migration to the U.S. involves a series of ups and down—some Mexicans were granted citizenship by treaty after their lands were annexed to the U.S., and, until the 1970s, they were considered legally white—a privilege granted to no other group. At the same time, Mexicans...
When Belle Starr was shot to death in 1889, a newspaper declared her to be "a most desperate woman." Her killer was never identified. Many suspected her son, whom Belle had recently beaten for mistreating her horse. Her unsolved murder was a fitting end to a life that was a whirlwind of violence, crime, and legend. She was born Myra Maybelle Shirley in 1848, and at the age of sixteen moved to the North...
In 1925, an anonymous novel called The Wind spotlighted the West Texas town of Sweetwater. The Wind told the tragic tale of Letty Mason, a Virginian who moves to Sweetwater during the drought-stricken 1880s. By book’s end, Letty has committed murder and suicide—driven in part by the relentless West Texas wind. Reviewers praised the book for depicting the West with "cold truth." However, many...
The series of pastels titled Twenty-four Hours with the Herd depicts an iconic Texas scene: the cattle drive. Artist Frank Reaugh completed the series in the 1930s, but they portray an earlier chapter of Texas history, when fences had not yet crossed the landscape, and men and cattle moved freely on the open range. Born in Illinois in 1860, Reaugh moved to Texas when he was fifteen. His family grew cotton, but young...
William Sydney Porter—better known by his pen name, O. Henry—was born in North Carolina and died in New York. But his sixteen years in Texas, from 1882 to 1898, made a lasting mark on his life and work. In Texas, Porter developed an abiding love for the American West. He worked as a ranch hand, a pharmacist, a draftsman; edited his own newspaper; and met his wife. It was also in Texas where Porter was...
Born about 1845, Comanche leader Quanah Parker lived two vastly different lives: the first as a warrior among the Plains Indians of Texas, and the second as a pragmatic leader who sought a place for his people in a rapidly changing America. Parker's birth was a direct result of the conflict between Native Americans and white settlers. His mother, Cynthia Parker, was captured by the Comanche as a child and later...
In the south foyer of the Texas State Capitol stand two life-sized statues: one of Sam Houston, the other of Stephen F. Austin. These men helped shape the state of Texas, but their marble likenesses were shaped by the hands of Elisabet Ney. Ney was born in Prussia in 1833, when ladies were expected merely to dabble in art, certainly not study it as a career. But Ney became the first woman admitted to Munich's...
Charles Goodnight liked to point out he was born in 1836, the year the Republic of Texas was founded, and moved here in 1845, the year Texas joined the United States. A legendary rancher and trailblazer, Goodnight became known as the "father of the Texas Panhandle." Goodnight was nine years old when his family arrived in Texas from Illinois. He served as a frontier scout and Texas Ranger in his youth, then entered...
Miriam Amanda Wallace wasn't considering a career in politics when she enrolled at Baylor Female College in the 1890s. In 1899, she married James Ferguson and planned to settle down and raise a family. However, Miriam would make history, becoming the first woman governor of Texas. Jim Ferguson was elected governor in 1914 and re-elected two years later. During his second term, he was impeached for misapplication of...
African American leader Norris Wright Cuney forged a remarkable career in post-Civil War Texas. Born into slavery in 1846, he nonetheless studied law and became a civic and political force in the years following Reconstruction. Cuney was the child of Adeline Stuart, a slave on a Hempstead plantation, and Stuart's owner, Philip Minor Cuney. At thirteen, Cuney's father freed him and sent him north for education....
People come from around the world to view the American art in Fort Worth's Amon Carter Museum. Works by Frederic Remington and Charles Russell, acquired by Carter, form the heart of the collection. Carter didn’t live to see his grand museum, but he didn’t build it for himself. He built it for his fellow citizens, especially those in his beloved city of Fort Worth. Carter was born in 1879 in tiny Crafton, Texas, near...
Calvert Nevaquaya plays traditional Comanche flute music.  
Many of the ranching terms used today are derived from Spanish, Mexican and indigenous words. These words come from the animals and tack of the cowboy trade, along with cultural items such as food and clothing. Below are common words or phrases, along with audio clips illustrating correct pronunciation.  
In this video, The First Lady Anita Perry talks about the Texas Governor's Mansion, including the history of the mansion, the contents of the mansion, former Governor's who lived intheMansion, and ends with the arson of the mansion and the resoration efforts that have been put in place to repare the home. 
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