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This is a fun short and informative documentary on the history of Texas by the History Channel. The documentary talks about the following: Spanish missionaries were the first European settlers in Texas, founding San Antonio in 1718. Hostile natives and isolation from other Spanish colonies kept Texas sparsely populated until following the Revolutionary War and the War of Mexican Independence, when the newly...
James Haley, Gov. Richards, and Gene Pipes offer their thoughts on the final days of Houston's life. His reputation, treatment by the community, and the story of Joshua Houston's offering to Margaret are retold in this series of clips.
Boxing legend Oscar De La Hoya hosts this History Channel two-hour (90 minute program time) special exploring the war that few American history books describe in depth, as it represents the only time in history when the United States could be considered a nation of conquest. As the result of the war, President James Polk was able to expand American borders to the Pacific Ocean, taking over nearly half of Mexico's...
FBI Strikes Waco, Texas Cult Compound (0:39) TV-PG On April 19, 2003, after a 51-day standoff with Branch Davidian cult members and their leader David Koresh, the FBI opened a tear-gas assault on the cult's compound in Waco, Texas. A news report that evening describes the scene as the cult sets fire to its buildings, and FBI spokesman Bob Ricks reacts.
Texas Joins the Union (2:52) TV-G Texans are known for their independent spirit, but joining the Union might have saved the state from disaster.
Inaugural Address: George H.W. Bush (2:12) TV-PG Excerpts from George Herbert Walker Bush's inaugural address on Friday, January 20, 1989.
How Texas Got Its Shape (2:41) TV-G Texas may have a “go-it-alone” reputation, but the state needed the United States much more than the nation needed the state. The Republic of Texas had to give up territory that stretched as far as modern-day Wyoming in exchange for statehood. Appx. 3 min long.
The Alamo (2:37) TV-PG Find out why the battle of the Alamo still captures the imaginations of Americans after more than two centuries. Video is appx. 3 min long.
Dust Storms Strike America (2:48) TV-PG Families were driven out of the once fertile Great Plains by massive dust clouds--one that rose to 10,000 feet and reached as far as New York City. Video is a bit under 3 min long.
Black Gold (2:41) TV-PG Spindletop, an east Texas oil Field, produced 80,000 barrels a day and changed the country and oil production forever. Video is a bit under 3 min long.
Deconstructing History: Alamo (2:47) TV-14 It has become the site and symbol of the battle for Texan independence, but there is much more to the story. Find out why Americans will always remember the Alamo. This video is a little under 3 min long.
In the segment "Jordan," date: 09/23/72: Texas State Senator Barbara Jordan gives a speech. This film reel contains short segments on news events in the Channel 11 viewing area, mostly within the city of Houston. The segments were filmed prior to the news show, and the anchorperson would have provided a voice-over describing the action and highlights of the news story. Each reel contains a series of film clips...
Mexican Heart Patient Operation by DeBakey & Baylor: Press conference following a successful procedure using the DeBakey pump on a heart patient, Mrs. Esperanza del Valle Vasquez, from Mexico City. The DeBakey pump, built by Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Rice University, and the Methodist Hospital in Houston, was used to take over part of the heart's workload following surgery while the patient was fitted for two...
KHOU-TV Film Box 6902, Reel 2 : footage from February to April, 1969: Cooley on Heart - Cost, Date: "04/06/69": Dr. Cooley discusses the cost of creating an artificial heart following the first implant of such a device. This film reel contains short segments on news events in the Channel 11 viewing area, mostly within the city of Houston. The segments were filmed prior to the news show, and the anchorperson would...
Podcast: Once separated from Mexico, political issues in the United States kept Texas from becoming a state, forcing it to govern itself as an independent republic. Additionally, many in Texas wanted the new country to expand to the Pacific Ocean and become a rival to the United States. Sam Houston maneuvered Texas into statehood and went on to serve as one of its first two U.S. senators, and later its governor.
Podcast: Renowned expert Jeff Dunn discusses the Texas Revolution and the battles that took place during March and April of 1836. Where did these battles take place? How did these battles unfold? And most importantly, how did they turn out? Featured paintings are by noted Texas artists Charles Shaw, Lee Jamison, and Lajos Marcos.
Podcast: What are some of the differences between a democracy and a dictatorship? How did these ideas influence the development of our country? Of Texas? Dr. Susannah Ural discusses these forms of government with your host, Ed Blackburn.
Podcast: Sam Houston was a man known for making decisions based upon strong principles. He was severely criticized for being unwilling to compromise those principles, but standing up to peer pressure and doing the right thing served him well in the long run.
It is a simple question: Why do we care about Sam Houston today? This is a collection of answers that many of our subject matter experts gave. (Sam Houston IV, Dr. Mike Campbell, Dr. Frank de la Teja, Sen. John Cornyn, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, Dr. Gregg Cantrell, James Haley, and Gov. Rick Perry)
Dr. Mike Campbell comments on Houstons orders with respect to the Alamo, and James Haley discusses Houstons battle strategy during the Texas Armys long retreat during the Runaway Scrape.
Dr. Campbell and James Haley discuss Houstons decision to spare Santa Annas life after San Jacinto and comment on his character and temperament.
Dr. Frank de la Teja explains the tensions in newly independent Mexico and the subsequent causes of political unrest in Texas. The clips conclude with a personal reflection of Gov. Ann Richards.
Sen. Hutchison, Dr. Cantrell, Dr. de la Teja, and Gov. Richards comment on the settlement of early Texas with respect to Stephen F. Austin and the empressario system, the political situation in Mexico and increasing tensions in Texas, and the Tejano participation in the Texas Revolution.
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