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This is a fun short and informative documentary on the history of Texas by the History Channel. The documentary talks about the following: Spanish missionaries were the first European settlers in Texas, founding San Antonio in 1718. Hostile natives and isolation from other Spanish colonies kept Texas sparsely populated until following the Revolutionary War and the War of Mexican Independence, when the newly...
This collection contains photographs and archival material related primarily to Mexican American families in Houston.
John J. Herrera was an attorney in Houston, Texas and president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). He was very active in advocating for civil rights for Hispanic and Mexican Americans in Houston. Herrera's extensive archive of materials are primarily related to his activities with LULAC.
Edited by J. Frank Dobie, 1924. Includes legends people, places, and supernatural events of Texas.
By Rahcel Lofton, Susie Hendrix and Jane Kennedy, 1926. A stirring narrative of adventure, hardship and privation in the early days of Texas, depicting struggles with the Indians and other adventures.
By J.W. Wilbarger, 1890. Reliable accounts of battles, wars, adventures, forays, murders, massacres, etc., together with biographical sketches of many of the most noted Indian fighters and frontiersmen of Texas. Source: Houston Metropolitan Research Center, Houston Public Library
Boxing legend Oscar De La Hoya hosts this History Channel two-hour (90 minute program time) special exploring the war that few American history books describe in depth, as it represents the only time in history when the United States could be considered a nation of conquest. As the result of the war, President James Polk was able to expand American borders to the Pacific Ocean, taking over nearly half of Mexico's...
A photo gallery from the History Channel of President George H W Bush.
A photo gallery from the History Channel of President Lyndon B. Johnson.
A photo gallery from the History Channel of President George W. Bush.
FBI Strikes Waco, Texas Cult Compound (0:39) TV-PG On April 19, 2003, after a 51-day standoff with Branch Davidian cult members and their leader David Koresh, the FBI opened a tear-gas assault on the cult's compound in Waco, Texas. A news report that evening describes the scene as the cult sets fire to its buildings, and FBI spokesman Bob Ricks reacts.
Texas Joins the Union (2:52) TV-G Texans are known for their independent spirit, but joining the Union might have saved the state from disaster.
Inaugural Address: George H.W. Bush (2:12) TV-PG Excerpts from George Herbert Walker Bush's inaugural address on Friday, January 20, 1989.
How Texas Got Its Shape (2:41) TV-G Texas may have a “go-it-alone” reputation, but the state needed the United States much more than the nation needed the state. The Republic of Texas had to give up territory that stretched as far as modern-day Wyoming in exchange for statehood. Appx. 3 min long.
The Alamo (2:37) TV-PG Find out why the battle of the Alamo still captures the imaginations of Americans after more than two centuries. Video is appx. 3 min long.
Dust Storms Strike America (2:48) TV-PG Families were driven out of the once fertile Great Plains by massive dust clouds--one that rose to 10,000 feet and reached as far as New York City. Video is a bit under 3 min long.
Black Gold (2:41) TV-PG Spindletop, an east Texas oil Field, produced 80,000 barrels a day and changed the country and oil production forever. Video is a bit under 3 min long.
Deconstructing History: Alamo (2:47) TV-14 It has become the site and symbol of the battle for Texan independence, but there is much more to the story. Find out why Americans will always remember the Alamo. This video is a little under 3 min long.
This book, written by Andrew Murphy Jackson, provides biographical sketches of noteworthy African Americans in Texas, and advice on how African Americans can lead fulfilling lives.
Presents aspects of the social, economical, and educational situation of Houston's African American population around 1915. Includes articles by different authors. Contains statistical data and numerous photos of people, streets, and buildings.
Special military orders for Captain R. Greene, Jr. Greene was empowered to inspect the Conscript officers in Western Texas.
Letter from Richard Greene to Richard Venables, dated April 8, 1864, with a suggestion that Venables apply for a position with General Greer. Includes a reply from Venables on the reverse, dated May 9, 1864. Venables gives an account of his recent illness, capture by the Yankees, and recovery.
Brief biography of Thomas M. Bagby. Contains a short history of how the site of his home became the location of the early Houston Public Library.
Invitation letter from the City of Houston regarding a Freedmen's Town/4th Ward Community Meeting on Wednesday, April 23, 2008.
Letter from C. F. Richardson to Governor James Allred thanking the governor for his participation in the National Negro Business League meeting on August 17,1938 in Houston. Richardson also informed Governor Allred that he planned to be in Austin on September 2nd and asked for a conference to discuss a few issues.
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