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Graduate students in the UT History Department’s Public History seminar led by Joan Neuberger examined documents in local archives and wrote a collection of historical essays on key aspects of that day’s events, as well as on the historical context, and the aftermath. In this episode, Neuberger discusses the project with four of those students: Itza Carbajal, Maria Hammack, Rebecca Johnston, and John Lisle.
The words "Mexican immigration" are usually enough to start a vibrant, politically and emotionally charged debate. Yet, the history of Mexican migration to the U.S. involves a series of ups and down—some Mexicans were granted citizenship by treaty after their lands were annexed to the U.S., and, until the 1970s, they were considered legally white—a privilege granted to no other group. At the same time, Mexicans...
In the century and a half since the war's end, historians, politicians, and laypeople have debated the causes of the U.S. Civil War: what truly led the Union to break up and turn on itself? And, even though it seems like the obvious answer, does a struggle over the future of slavery really explain why the south seceded, and why a protracted military struggle followed? Can any one explanation do so satisfactorily?...
After the chaos of the American Civil War, Congress and lawmakers had to figure out how to put the Union back together again–no easy feat, considering that issues of political debate were settled on the battlefield, but not in the courtroom nor in the arena of public opinion. How did the defeated South and often vindictive North manage to resolve their differences over issues so controversial that they had torn the...
A great source of content for teachers.At the time of its inception, the United States was the only functioning democracy in the world. However, this does not mean the founders created the American ideal of freedom ex nihilo. As Dr. Fears argues, they drew on the Old Testament, Greece, Rome, Christianity, and the English tradition of liberty to create a political order of democracy, divided power, and individual...
A great source of content for teachers.Only five men signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Why? Dr. Fears argues that the American Revolution was fought for limited government and low taxes, but the Constitution is a charter for a strong national government with broad power to tax. Despite the anxieties of men like Patrick Henry, the Constitution has aided the cause of liberty through...
A great source of content informaiton for teachers.The Revolutionary War delivered the colonists from English rule, but it did not result in effective governance. Financial crisis, disunity, and a dysfunctional system of confederation threatened to undo the achievements of independence. But this crisis called forth, in the Constitutional Convention, a group of statesmen who were willing to compromise to save the...
A great source of content for teachers.The story of freedom in the United States cannot be told without the Declaration of Independence. Dr. Fears explains what the stirring first paragraph of the Declaration meant to Americans in 1776 and what we’ve lost since then. But freedom is not only freedom from British rule. It must also be freedom to participate in the political system and to choose one’s own way of life....
Great resource for teacher knowlege and content.From the Louisiana Purchase onward, American settlers extended into the frontier what Jefferson called “the Empire of Liberty.” In this lecture, Dr. Fears tells the story of the Texan war of independence from Mexico. A recurring theme in this series is the necessity of courage and sacrifice in defense of freedom. Dr. Fears reiterates the importance of courage and honor...
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