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James Haley, Gov. Richards, and Gene Pipes offer their thoughts on the final days of Houston's life. His reputation, treatment by the community, and the story of Joshua Houston's offering to Margaret are retold in this series of clips.
Podcast: Once separated from Mexico, political issues in the United States kept Texas from becoming a state, forcing it to govern itself as an independent republic. Additionally, many in Texas wanted the new country to expand to the Pacific Ocean and become a rival to the United States. Sam Houston maneuvered Texas into statehood and went on to serve as one of its first two U.S. senators, and later its governor.
Podcast: Renowned expert Jeff Dunn discusses the Texas Revolution and the battles that took place during March and April of 1836. Where did these battles take place? How did these battles unfold? And most importantly, how did they turn out? Featured paintings are by noted Texas artists Charles Shaw, Lee Jamison, and Lajos Marcos.
Podcast: What are some of the differences between a democracy and a dictatorship? How did these ideas influence the development of our country? Of Texas? Dr. Susannah Ural discusses these forms of government with your host, Ed Blackburn.
Podcast: Sam Houston was a man known for making decisions based upon strong principles. He was severely criticized for being unwilling to compromise those principles, but standing up to peer pressure and doing the right thing served him well in the long run.
It is a simple question: Why do we care about Sam Houston today? This is a collection of answers that many of our subject matter experts gave. (Sam Houston IV, Dr. Mike Campbell, Dr. Frank de la Teja, Sen. John Cornyn, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, Dr. Gregg Cantrell, James Haley, and Gov. Rick Perry)
Dr. Mike Campbell comments on Houstons orders with respect to the Alamo, and James Haley discusses Houstons battle strategy during the Texas Armys long retreat during the Runaway Scrape.
Dr. Campbell and James Haley discuss Houstons decision to spare Santa Annas life after San Jacinto and comment on his character and temperament.
Dr. Frank de la Teja explains the tensions in newly independent Mexico and the subsequent causes of political unrest in Texas. The clips conclude with a personal reflection of Gov. Ann Richards.
Sen. Hutchison, Dr. Cantrell, Dr. de la Teja, and Gov. Richards comment on the settlement of early Texas with respect to Stephen F. Austin and the empressario system, the political situation in Mexico and increasing tensions in Texas, and the Tejano participation in the Texas Revolution.
Under the stewardship of Johnson, southern whites held constitutional conventions throughout 1865, drafting new constitutions that outlawed slavery but changed little else. When the Republican-dominated U.S. Congress reassembled late in 1865, they put a stop to the leniency and inaugurated Radical (or Congressional) Reconstruction, a process that resulted in the immediate passage of the Civil Rights bill and the...
The passage of the first Reconstruction Act by Congressional Republicans radically altered the direction of Reconstruction. The Act invalidated the reconstituted Southern legislatures, establishing five military districts in the South and insisting upon black suffrage as a condition to readmission. The eventful year 1868 saw the impeachment of one president (Andrew Johnson) and the election of another (Ulysses S....
The Turning point in the Civil War was the re-election of Abraham Lincoln in 1864. Although the concerted efforts of northern Peace Democrats and a palpable war weariness among the electorate made Lincolns victory uncertain, timely Union victories in Atlanta and Mobile in September of 1864 secured Lincolns re-election in November. This lecture concludes Professor Blights section on the war, following Lee and Grant...
Professor Blight offers a number of approaches to the question of southern distinctiveness. The lecture offers a survey of that manner in which commentators--American, foreign, northern, and southern--have sought to make sense of the nature of southern society and southern history. The lecture analyzes the society and culture of the Old South, with special emphasis on the aspects of southern life that made the...
Professor Blight lectures on southern slavery. He makes a case for viewing the U.S. South as one of the five true slave societies in world history. He discusses the internal slave trade that moved thousands of slaves from the eastern seaboard to the cotton states of the Southwest between 1820 and 1860. Professor Blight then sketches the contents of the pro-slavery argument, including its biblical, historical,...
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