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Thie Week in Texas History, a video series released by the Texas General Land Office, documents significant dates in Texas History throughout the calendar year. In this video, learn about the origins of the Lonestar Texas Flag. The video explores the competing design options of the time period and the origin of the iconic winning design by Texan Charles Stewart. 
The Heritage Society at Sam Houston Park has recently released a short video documenting the accomplishments of Ninfa Laurenzo. Ninfa Laurenzo, with the support of her husband and family, popularized fajitas in Tex-Mex restaurants and set numerous other trends in Houston food culture during the 20th century. Later in life, Laurenzo became very active in Texas politics. HAM slice #47 traces Laurenzo's life and legacy...
Trammel’s Trace tells the story of a borderlands smuggler and an important passageway into early Texas. Trammel’s Trace, named for Nicholas Trammell, was the first route from the United States into the northern boundaries of Spanish Texas. From the Great Bend of the Red River it intersected with El Camino Real de los Tejas in Nacogdoches. By the early nineteenth century, Trammel’s Trace was largely a smuggler’s...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
In a recent release of the Texas Originals podcast by Humanities Texas, the story of Lorenzo de Zavala is documented. Zavala had a strong commitment to fighting oppression. Zavala was a leading official in the Mexican government under Santa Anna in the early 19th century, but he began to disapprove of Santa Anna's consolidation of power in Texas in the 1830s. At this time, Zavala became a prominent...
James Harkins from the Texas General Land office presents an early photographic map of Austin in 1887 and a map used by Stephen F. Austin during the Mexican National period. Harkins explains the way in which maps were used by empresarios to advertise to settlers.  Harkins also explains the way in which maps demonstrate change over time.
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image has recently released The Henry Kuempel Collection. The Texas Archive of the Moving Image received the films as a donation from the Austin History Center. The collection consists of the home movies shot by Kuempel, Texas resident, from the 1940s and 1950s. The films show a glimpse of the final days of Austin street cars, the early days of Round Up celebrations at the University...
The Texas Navy Association has recently released How the Texas Navy Saved the Revolution, a 22-minute video source documenting the role of the Texas navy in the Texas Revolution. The film advances the mission of the Texas Navy Association to present the history of the Texas Navy to Texans and non-Texans alike. The resource is FREE to teachers who complete a short survey at https://texasnavy.org/TeachersFilmRequest...
Get ready to take an ENTERTAINING and EDUCATIONAL stroll through TEXAS HISTORY while learning some FUN TEXAS FACTS along the way!! A TWO PART book. The first part is a rhyming and witty story that touches on some of the history of Texas while also introducing the importance, meaning and symbols that are relevant in our state. The second part includes 28 fun Texas facts mixed with more knowledge of fundamental...
The Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the missions inspired the Texas State Historical Association to feature Dr. Jesús “Frank” de la Teja, Director for the Center for...
The Texas State Histroical Association provides a series of videos documenting the role Texas played in WWI. Sample topics include "Women of Fort Worth during WWI" and "WWI Training Camp in Downtown Houston"
This coloring book from Texas State Library and Archives Commission features images from the 1938 pamphlet. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a work relief program created part of the New Deal program established by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933. The original pamphlet comes from the Civilia Conservation Corps files of the Texas State Parks Board recordss at the Texas State Library and Archives,
A podcast series produced by Stevie Ray Vaughn in Conjunction with the Bullock Museum which examines the history and development of Vaughn’s own signature musical style as well as the musical culture of Texas
The Texas Historical Commission has launched a web documentary film about the Massacre at Goliad. 360* camera technology was used to be attractive and immersive for Texas history students. It can be viewed on laptop, cell phone, tablet, VR headsets or on the THC website. A Chrome browser provides the best experience. All of the sites for the Massacre were shot on location and the artifacts shown were gathered from...
Graduate students in the UT History Department’s Public History seminar led by Joan Neuberger examined documents in local archives and wrote a collection of historical essays on key aspects of that day’s events, as well as on the historical context, and the aftermath. In this episode, Neuberger discusses the project with four of those students: Itza Carbajal, Maria Hammack, Rebecca Johnston, and John Lisle.
For the Texas World War I Centennial Commemoration, this is a list of World War I training sites in Texas.
American Armies and Battlefields in Europe: A History, Guide and Reference Book was first published in 1927 by the American Battle Monuments Commission with almost 600 pages to commemorate America's involvement into World War I. By 1938, the book was expanded with additional research to serve as a history of the American Expeditionary Forces’ accomplishments. Among the contributing authors was Maj. Dwight D....
This collection of audio/visual materials contains micro-documentaries on a variety of WWI subjects. Created under the Student Filmmaker's Project at St. Mary's University, most of these are about 5 minutes in length.
The goal of this guide is to enhance your students’ visit to the exhibit A Destined Conflict: The U.S. - Mexican War. The lessons were excerpted from Curriculum Guide for Teaching Texas History, which is available for download at http://www.sanjacintomuseum.org/Education/For_Teachers/. Lesson documents are in PDF format for ease of downloading, but Word versions are available to teachers on request to insure...
Admiral Chester Nimitz was assigned as commander-in-chief of the Pacific Fleet following the Pearl Harbor attack. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer elaborate on the life of Admiral Nimitz that prepared him for the role, including his childhood in Fredericksburg, Texas.
As America entered WWII, it was apparent that U.S. naval aviation technology ranked behind Japanese technology. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer discuss the changes to U.S. military technology and mindset during the 1940s
Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer describe the period of American globalization and expansion of commerce that preceded the attack on Pearl Harbor, and detail the reasons for engaging in war with Japan.
Part one of the Texas Talk, The 75th Commemoration of Pearl Harbor and the Texas Connection with James D. Hornfischer. Joe Cavanaugh and James D. Hornfischer respond to the question of how Pearl Harbor resonates with audiences 75 years later.
The 75th Commemoration of Pearl Harbor and the Texas Connection with James D. Hornfischer. Bestselling author James D. Hornfischer and Joe Cavanaugh from the National Museum of the Pacific War discuss the history surrounding the attack on Pearl Harbor and its connection to Texas. Admiral Chester Nimitz was named the commander-in-chief of the Pacific Fleet weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and led America's...
The Bullock Texas State History Museum presents an up-close look at 81 of its artifacts in a full-color coffee-table book, “Seeing Texas History” (University of Texas Press, $40 hardcover). The artifact photographs are arranged chronologically, beginning with an ancient tool made from a rabbit jaw and continuing through cultural and historical items from modern-day Texas. Each picture is accompanied by a short text...
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