header image
A great source of content for teachers.At the time of its inception, the United States was the only functioning democracy in the world. However, this does not mean the founders created the American ideal of freedom ex nihilo. As Dr. Fears argues, they drew on the Old Testament, Greece, Rome, Christianity, and the English tradition of liberty to create a political order of democracy, divided power, and individual...
A great source of content for teachers.Only five men signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Why? Dr. Fears argues that the American Revolution was fought for limited government and low taxes, but the Constitution is a charter for a strong national government with broad power to tax. Despite the anxieties of men like Patrick Henry, the Constitution has aided the cause of liberty through...
A great source of content informaiton for teachers.The Revolutionary War delivered the colonists from English rule, but it did not result in effective governance. Financial crisis, disunity, and a dysfunctional system of confederation threatened to undo the achievements of independence. But this crisis called forth, in the Constitutional Convention, a group of statesmen who were willing to compromise to save the...
A great source of content for teachers.The story of freedom in the United States cannot be told without the Declaration of Independence. Dr. Fears explains what the stirring first paragraph of the Declaration meant to Americans in 1776 and what we’ve lost since then. But freedom is not only freedom from British rule. It must also be freedom to participate in the political system and to choose one’s own way of life....
Great resource for teacher knowlege and content.From the Louisiana Purchase onward, American settlers extended into the frontier what Jefferson called “the Empire of Liberty.” In this lecture, Dr. Fears tells the story of the Texan war of independence from Mexico. A recurring theme in this series is the necessity of courage and sacrifice in defense of freedom. Dr. Fears reiterates the importance of courage and honor...
Audio of George W. Bush: Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the Union, January 29, 2002.
Audio of George W. Bush: Address to the Nation Announcing Strikes Against Al Qaida Training Camps and Taliban Military Installations in Afghanistan, October 7, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: The Presidents Radio Address, September 15, 2001
Audio of George W. Bush: Remarks at the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance Service, September 14, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Remarks to Police, Firemen, and Rescueworkers at the World Trade Center Site in New York City, September 14, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Remarks in a Telephone Conversation With New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and New York Governor George E. Pataki and an Exchange With Reporters, September 13, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Remarks Following a Meeting With the National Security Team, September 12, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Address to the Nation on the Terrorist Attacks, September 11, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Remarks in Sarasota, Florida, on the Terrorist Attack on the World Trade Center, September 11, 2001.
Audio of George W. Bush: Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia, August 3, 2000.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 14, 1969.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Address to the Nation Upon Proclaiming a Day of Mourning Following the Death of Dr. King, April 5, 1968.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: The Presidents Address to the Nation Announcing Steps To Limit the War in Vietnam and Reporting His Decision Not To Seek Reelection, March 31, 1968.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 17, 1968.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Address at the State Departments Foreign Policy Conference for Educators, June 19, 1967.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 10, 1967.
Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 12, 1966
Audio and Video of Lyndon B. Johnson: Remarks With President Truman at the Signing in Independence of the Medicare Bill, July 30, 1965
Video and Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Address in San Francisco at the 20th Anniversary Commemorative Session of the United Nations, June 25, 1965.
Video and Audio of Lyndon B. Johnson: Address to Members of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists: The Challenge of Human Need in Viet-Nam, May 13, 1965.
avatar-url