header image
This lesson highlights the work of lumberjacks and millworkers, as well as the benefits of the paper industry, the need for conscientious timber stewardship, and the importance of lumber to the Texas economy. Using videos showing different aspects of lumber production and outside research from their textbooks and reference websites, students will analyze and compare depictions of the lumber industry – both those...
Oyez, Oyez, Oh Yay! is an interactive website that focuses on the landmark court decisions that Texas students must know to be successful in preparing for the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) assessment tests in U.S. government and history. Students and teachers can search through the case summaries, videos and other helpful resources. And teachers, there are teaching strategies and suggested curriculum...
The bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941 catapulted America into World War II. In San Antonio, the potential threat of aerial bombardment and the need to strengthen Pan-American alliances, introduced new sights, sounds, and activities to the civilian population. Discover intriguing aspects of San Antonio's war years with this exhibit.
Discover the story of the plaza's transformation from the 1850s through the 1980s in historic photos. Journey counterclockwise around the plaza, starting at the Alamo, to learn more about the enterprising men and women who shaped the plaza as a destination. Interspersed between photos of the plaza's historic buildings, you will find windows into social life on the plaza.
This companion piece to our Heritage Education program allows you to visit all five Spanish colonial missions with the click of a mouse. Find your way around the mission grounds with drawings from the 1890s, step back in time to visit the mission ruins in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and learn more about each mission's distinctive architectural features. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural...
The Oral History of the Texas Oil Industry Records collection documents the development of the Texas oil industry from the turn of the century to 1950. It includes 218 taped interviews of oral reminiscences recalled by pioneers in all phases of oil fields and oil booms--roughnecks, drillers, promoters, financiers, contractors, leasemen and law officers. The project was undertaken by sixteen interviewers who recorded...
This is an online historical exhibition depicting the the Annexation of Texas, the Mexican-American War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 1845–1848 created by the U.S. Department of State with historical documents found at the Office of the Historian in the Bureau of Public Affairs.
This site from the University of Houston features a well-researched Digital History on the Texas Revolutions at http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu
A portion of a huge mural, depicting Texas history, inside the Hall of State, the grand exhibition hall for Texas itself at the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition at Fair Park in Dallas, Texas. This photograph is found that the Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
The Eugene C. Barker Texas History Collection was created in 1945 and named in honor of University of Texas professor Eugene Campbell Barker, a pioneer in the field of Texas history. The Barker Collection includes books, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, photographs, broadsides, and recorded sound and constitutes the most extensive collection of Texas-related material in existence. Includes: the Bexar Archives, 300,000...
This library includes books, serials, documents, photographs, and other archival materials relating to aviation of that period collected by Williams Jr. himself and other donors. George H. Williams Jr. was born on Apr. 7, 1915 in Frost, Texas. He acquired a Bachelor’s Degree in Business from Baylor University in 1939. During World War II, he was a Signal Officer with the 94th Signal Battalion, which was attached to...
Presented by the UNT Archives, this collection features photographs, video, and scripts from news stories produced by the station during its early years. KXAS was the first television station in Texas and the Southwest when it signed on as WBAP-TV on September 27, 1948. It is an NBC owned station in Fort Worth which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.
The Texana Collections contain items relating to Texas history. It is a substantial part of the archive and library of J. Frank Dobie (1888-1964). It includes Manuscripts for the folklorist's books, tales, and articles are here, as is a massive correspondence file. A collection of five hundred paintings, etchings, prints, maps, photographs, drawings, and sculptures collected by Dobie including works by Charles...
American Prisoners of War" includes compelling firsthand narratives from World War II POWs Robert Preston Taylor, Rufus W. Smith, and Roy Maxwell Offerle; World War I POW Pat O'Brien; Vietnam War POW Congressman Sam Johnson; and Andersonville prisoner Prescott Tracy, as well as resources on American prisoners of the Korean War and a selection of POW-related film and radio documentaries. Most of the veterans featured...
An article on Oveta Culp Hobby in Houston History Magazine.
Robert Yarnall Richie was a photographer who had many clients in Texas, ca. 1936-1970. During this time, Richie booked photography assignments from many large corporations, including virtually all notable oil-related companies in Texas. These photographs, when viewed collectively, showcase the history, equipment, facilities, and employees of Texas industry during the mid-20th century.
This digital collection contains a growing number of photographs depicting Texas railroads. From roughly the 1870s-1940s, railroads were the transportation backbone of Texas and played an indelible role in the financial and cultural growth of the state.
This digital collection contains some 2,000 photographic images, real photographic postcards, books, historic documents, and maps of Texas. Of particular note are several collections of early photographic postcards showing Texas railroads, early oil fields and rigs, courthouses, military camps, parades, and events in small Texas towns.
This digital collection contains approximately 3,600 photographs, ca. 1846-1945, including Confederate and Union soldiers and officers in the Civil War and a wide spectrum of Texan citizens, including African American, American Indian, and Caucasian men, women, and children. The photographs provide a unique glimpse into the social and domestic history of Texas, as well as Texas architecture, transportation, ranching...
This collection contains photographs and archival material related primarily to Mexican American families in Houston.
John J. Herrera was an attorney in Houston, Texas and president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). He was very active in advocating for civil rights for Hispanic and Mexican Americans in Houston. Herrera's extensive archive of materials are primarily related to his activities with LULAC.
Through archeology, archival records, and oral history, the Ransom and Sarah Williams farmstead project has revealed the story of one African American family’s transition from slavery to freedom. In a larger sense it represents thousands of other African American families whose stories cannot be told.
Elizabeth Ellen 'Lizzie' Johnson Williams (1840-1924) was a schoolteacher, cattle dealer, and real estate investor. In 1871 this early Texas 'cattle queen' registered her cattle brand under the name 'Elizabeth Johnson.' She is believed to have been the first woman in Texas to ride up the Chisholm Trail with her own herd that carried her own brand. Sources: Lawrence T. Jones III; Handbook of Texas Online.
This primary document comprises: The Constitution of the State of Texas, as Amended in 1861; The Constitution of the Confederate States of America; and The Ordinances of the Texas Convention: and An Address to the People of Texas. It was Printed by Order of the Convention and the Senate by John Marshall, State Printer, 1861, in Austin.
Edited by J. Frank Dobie, 1924. Includes legends people, places, and supernatural events of Texas.
avatar-url