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Dr. Crimm discusses the Galvez family, including the life of Bernardo’s uncle Jose de Galvez, who came from humble beginnings and made an enduring impact on history due to his influence on the Bourbon monarch Spain’s King Charles III. Crimm also discusses the role of Creoles in the New Spain, who eventually lead to Mexico's independence from Spain.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions and answers after her talk on November 2, 2015 on Berdardo de Galvez. She discusses his treks to the Pacific, how he funded and smuggled supplies to the Americans during the Revolutionary War, the legacy of Galvez in Mexico and the first cattle drive from Texas to Louisiana.
On November 2, 2015, Dr. Caroline Castillo Crimm presented “Bernardo de Galvez and the Impact of the American Revolution on Texas.” Galvez is the namesake for Galveston Island and he was a governor, general and viceroy of Mexico. During his lifetime his family was one of the most distinguished in the royal service of Spain. Following family tradition, Bernardo chose a military career. Before Spain entered the...
McCaslin discusses the impact of the Marqués de Rubí's inspection and subsequent recommendations for ruling the area in the 18th century, advising much of the area in Texas to be abandoned.
On October 14, 2015 Dr. Rick McCaslin discussed the the regulation of the presidios in Texas after the Marqués de Rubí's inspection of the territory.
Dr. McCaslin discusses the deplorable conditions of the Spanish presidios of Texas in the 18th century.
Dr. McCaslin sets the stage to discuss the Spanish Empire and the Marqués de Rubí's task to inspect and make recommendations to the King about Spain's northern territory in Texas and across the southwest in the 18th century.
Dr. McCaslin takes questions after his presentation on the Marqués de Rubí on October 14, 2015. He discusses the Spanish presidios in Texas, its native peoples, Spanish soldiers experiences, the Spanish authority during the 18th century.
Dr. De la Teja discusses missionaries and Fray Margil in New Spain in Central American and Texas, focusing on the activities of the missions, which includes conversions of Natives.
Dr. De la Teja discusses the Spanish Empire and Christianity as they relate to Fray Margil's mission and experiences in the 17th and 18th Centuries in Texas.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja speaks about how some tend to oversimplify Texas history and there is much more to the story. Dr. De la Teja discusses the unique worlds of Fray Margil and other characters in Texas in the Spanish Colonial period.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members' questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
This is the complete session with Dr. Jesus de la Teja. He discusses the origins of Mission San Jose and how history of how the Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the...
The Heard Natural Science Museum...
Texas Perspectives is a wire-style service produced by The University of Texas at Austin that is intended to provide media outlets with meaningful and thoughtful opinion columns (op-eds) on a variety of topics and current events. Authors are faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft columns that adhere to journalistic best practices and Associated Press style...
This article examines cemetery preservation and the role of cemeteries in urban locations. It presents Travis County's plans to preserve its 250 known cemeteries and the city of Austin's five historic municipal cemeteries. Cemeteries gain meaning as aggregates of history, because the are "storybooks" according to cemetery preservationists.
The Texas Politics Project regularly interviews current and former political journalists, newsmakers, and political actors in order to capture a comprehensive set of contemporary, first person accounts of Texas political history. The project also engages in a range of educational initiatives including maintaining an online Texas politics textbook, offering an online course in Texas politics that meets the state's...
On January 24, 1888, William W. Ford patented what he called a new and improved voting-machine. His design consists in "the combination, with the transverse bridge, through the opening of which are fulcrumed by means of a pin two parallel keys, said keys having pivotally connected to their fulcrumed ends to parallel pawls, the free ends of which mesh with teeth in two ratchet-wheels carrying hands indicating on a...
This article highlights Joe Lewis and his accomplishments as one of the few African Americans recruited into the Negro Baseball League in South Texas. The University of Texas at San Antonio Institute of Texan Cultures will present their project titled "Invisible Diamonds: Stories of Baseball in the African American Communities of Texas." The free presentation will take place at the institute's Back 40 outdoor...
Refugio was established in 1795, but with rising problems and a failed mission of establishment, it wasn’t until 1828 that Refugio became a permanent settlement in Texas. Refugio played an important role in the Texas Revolution by forming together and electing Sam Houston and James Power to represent Refugio at the First Convention of Texas in order to form a new government, and at the Battle of Refugio, which took...
This is a compiled history of women mail carriers written by the United States Postal Servive Historian in June 2007. The list of biographies include aviatrix Katherine Stinson who is referred as being the first woman to carry mail by airplane in 1913.
This online source brings focus to the members of the famous early aviation family, the Stinsons, particularly Marjorie and Katherine. Katherine established the Stinson School of Flying in San Antonio in 1913.
A World War II program traded German and Italian Americans for Americans who were trapped abroad. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Jan Jarboe Russell.
KXAS was the first television station in Texas and the Southwest when it signed on as WBAP-TV on September 27, 1948. It is an NBC owned station in Fort Worth which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Presented by the UNT Archives, this collection features photographs, video, and scripts from news stories produced by the station during its early years.
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