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This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
This is a primary document of James Bowie's Mexican Land Grant Application from 1830. James "Jim" Bowie is considered one of the legendary figures in Texas history. Although not a native Texan, Bowie has become a folk hero known for both a large-bladed knife and the even larger fame gained at the battle of the Alamo. Before he came to Texas, the Kentucky-born Bowie was already well known in Louisiana— not as a...
This is a primary document of the letter that imprisoned Stephen Austin. It is featured at the Bullock Museum on the 182nd anniversary of Austin's imprisonment. After becoming an empresario in 1823, Stephen Austin worked diligently with the Mexican government to protect his colonists’ rights. Ten years after his arrival in present-day Texas, and 182 years ago today, this letter ordering his arrest signaled an end to...
This is a primary document of the Testimonio (Certified Copy) of Stephen F. Austin's Second Empresario Contract, the contract that allowed Stephen F. AUstin to bring 500 families to Mexican Texas. Often called "The Father of Texas," Stephen F. Austin carved out his place in history by bringing thousands of settlers to Mexican Texas from the United States. In the 1820s, Austin and his father, Moses, became land...
This is a primary document of John Mitchell's oath of office. John Mitchell was one one of the first African American to be elected to the Texas House of Representatives. African Americans in Texas experienced the right to vote for the first time between February 10–14, 1868. After the 11th Texas Legislature met in 1866 and refused to pass the amendments abolishing slavery and granting citizenship to African...
This is a primary document. It is the Oath of Office document of Richard Allen, one of Texas' first African American Legislator. Richard Allen (1830–1909) was born enslaved in Richmond, Virginia, and arrived in Harris County with slave owner J. J. Cain in 1837. As a young man, Allen gained a solid reputation for construction and engineering work, and designed and helped to build the impressive Houston mansion of...
The Benson Latin American Collection and the Office of the Director of the Univeristy of Texas Libraries have jointly created this Collections Highlight online exhibition. This exhibition highlights Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's memoirs during his final exile in Havana in 1872. Sometimes referred to as “the Napoleon of the West,” Santa Anna — who served as president of Mexico in multiple, non-consecutive terms — is...
The Hood’s Brigade, 5th Texas Regiment, Company I Muster Roll, 1862-1864, contains an original copy and photocopy of the 4-page muster roll for Company I of the Fifth Texas Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade. The muster roll contains a list of members with rank and casualty record while the regiment was under the command of Confederate officer Jerome B. Robertson. This collection was processed by Chester V....
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discusses the Gonzales Cannon(s) controversy from the Mexican side of history.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, avocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument in this very interesting webinar.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville she meets a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune off steam boating and was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He becomes one of the richest ranchers next to Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin marry in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela, who becomes the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in a census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appears that her children were born throughout...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decides to move her family to New Orleans. She sold her ranch property to do this. By 1845 Patricia returns to Texas and her children scatter. Many get involved in court battles. Many...
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who have 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. Their colony's location creates political issues and discord, as it is surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commission and is in charge of assigning land to settlers...
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who have 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. Their colony's location creates political issues and discord, as it is surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commission and is in charge of assigning land to settlers...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia de Leon's life. Patricia donates her entire dowry to her husband to purchase land for what becomes the de Leon colony in Texas at the beginning of the 19th century. She gives birth to ten children who live through Mexican Independence in Mexico and Texas. The family returns to live in Mexico during the time of the Battle of Medina in Texas, which was devastating for many families and...
Dr. Crimm's full Texas Talks on two Tejano women: Patricia de Leon and Petra Vela Kenedy, recorded in December 2015, contrasts these women's experiences in 19th century Texas. Patricia de la Garza de Leon was born in 1775 from a prominent Mexican family. She inherited a fortune from her father, which she used, along with her empresario husband, Martin de Leon’s money earned from the sale of livestock to establish...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Galvez as the governor of New Orleans, detailing his marriage and family, as well as military successes in the region.
Dr. Crimm discusses the military experiences of Galvez, who as a young lieutenant was assigned to Chihuahua. He was charged with defeating the Apache in this desolate region and inspired his men to to bravery. Galvez learns the meaning of command in Mexico. He also meets and defeats the Apache, taking them captive. Back in Chihuahua, instead of punishing them, Galvez learns their language and speaks to them. He...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Bernardo de Galvez and the outcome of the Louisiana Purchase and the governance of Louisiana by Spain.
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