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This collection represents three titles: the Stephenville Empire and Stephenville Tribune, which were competing publications, and a third title created upon merger of the two in 1929. Editorials in these newspapers offer information of special interest, as they provide an important means for gauging local opinions on historical events. Availability of this newspaper collection on The Portal to Texas History means...
This collection hosts the newspaper history of Stephenville, including the Stephenville Empire, the Stephenville Tribune, the Stephenville Empire-Tribune, and the weekly student newspaper from Tarleton State University, the J-TAC. This collection is a part of the Portal to Texas History.
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
The Texas Politics Project regularly interviews current and former political journalists, newsmakers, and political actors in order to capture a comprehensive set of contemporary, first person accounts of Texas political history. The project also engages in a range of educational initiatives including maintaining an online Texas politics textbook, offering an online course in Texas politics that meets the state's...
KXAS was the first television station in Texas and the Southwest when it signed on as WBAP-TV on September 27, 1948. It is an NBC owned station in Fort Worth which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Presented by the UNT Archives, this collection features photographs, video, and scripts from news stories produced by the station during its early years.
This companion piece to our Heritage Education program allows you to visit all five Spanish colonial missions with the click of a mouse. Find your way around the mission grounds with drawings from the 1890s, step back in time to visit the mission ruins in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and learn more about each mission's distinctive architectural features. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural...
The Danish Heritage Preservation Society contributes their collection of over 300 photographs to the Portal. The images date back to the 1800's and portray a variety of events, organizations, people, and places that relate to the Danish culture in Texas.
Journey through the African American culture and heritage in Texas, and discover a long and proud legacy that has undeniably shaped today’s Lone Star State mystique. Through hardships and triumphs, valor and determination, and influence and change, people of African descent have contributed greatly to our state’s development. Explore this website to discover these real stories and real places that define the history...
A photo gallery from the History Channel of President George W. Bush.
Invitation letter from the City of Houston regarding a Freedmen's Town/4th Ward Community Meeting on Wednesday, April 23, 2008.
The Boys Scouts of America asked the UNT Digital Libraries Division to digitize a full run of Scouting Magazine to celebrate the magazine’s centennial anniversary. Reading through 100 years of issues provides an interesting reflection of social and political changes in the country. The magazine helped promote rationing and victory gardens during both World Wars and encouraged assisting the poor during the Depression...
Primary and secondary teachers will especially appreciate the Texas Folklife Festival collection belonging to the University of Texas at San Antonio’s Institute of Texan Cultures. More than 4,000 photographs capture traditional customs, foodways, and folk dancing of a range of ethnic groups in Texas that include the Czech-Moravians, Lebanese, Koreans, Poles, Germans, Scandinavians, Mexican Americans, Irish, and...
With the generous support of the Amon Carter Foundation, the UNT Libraries completed their latest, large-scale digitization project titled Texas Cultures Online, which features more than 16,000 historical items that showcase Texas’ diverse cultural heritage. Seventeen institutions, consisting of large and small public libraries, universities, private family collections, museums, and historical societies participated...
Bio and burial information on Ann Richards from the Texas State Cemetery. Links to related primary sources can be found on this page.
Bio and burial information on Barbara Jordan at the Texas State Cemetery. This page includes links to related primary sources.
Bio and burial information on Governor John B. Connally from the Texas State Cemetery. This page includes links to related primary sources.
African Americans have been part of the landscape of Texas for as long as Europeans and their descendants. Spanning a period of more than five centuries, African-American presence began in 1528 with the arrival of Estevanico, an African slave who accompanied the first Spanish exploration of the land in the southwestern part of the United States that eventually became Texas. While African Americans have been...
This image gallery works with the San Jacinto Museum's Curriculum Guide for Teaching Texas History. 
As students and faculty members resume their classwork at Garrison Hall this semester, it is worth examining Garrison Halls colorful history and architectural conception. The first stages of Garrisons development began in 1922 as the Board of Regents sought a new campus plan for the university. Although the Board had been employing the eminent New York City architect Cass Gilbert—whose achievements include the U.S....
The digital preservation of this collection was made possible by a grant to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image and the Houston Public Library from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services.
Since its inception, Not Even Past has dedicated itself to the idea that historians and history students aren’t the only ones capable of writing and enjoying history. The University of Texas at Austin’s Physics Department has proven us right with the release of its new website “University of Texas at Austin: Physics Department History.” The website, created by Emeritus Professor Melvin Oakes, offers a remarkable...
This site, developed by the Institute of Southern Jewish Life with funding from Humanities Texas and the Texas Jewish Historical Society, contains detailed, illustrated histories of 55 different Jewish communities from across the state. Each history discusses the origins, development, and current state of the local Jewish community.
The Samuel Peterson Diaries were purchased by Tarlton Law Library in 2007 and added to Rare Books and Special Collections. This virtual exhibit was originally designed to complement a physical exhibit displayed in the Susman-Godfrey atrium of Jones Hall in Spring 2008. The Rare Books and Special Collections department at Tarlton Law Library serves as the repository for the Law School's historical materials and...
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