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One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This is a secondary source designed by Humanities Texas that include excerpts from the report of Lieutenant Neil M. Howison in 1846. If historical documents are passports for time travel, there is no better embarkation point than the stacks of the National Archives. On dimly lit shelves, gray Hollinger manuscript boxes and bound volumes preserve countless handwritten reports, petitions, and letters spanning more...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
This is a primary online source held by the Texas State library and archives commission. It Features historical records that highlight the history of Texas during the Civil War and under the Rebel Flag. From 2011-2015, the United States commemorates the Sequiscentennial of the American Civil War. Texas was among those states voting to secede from the Union and join the Confederacy in 1861. From the embattled cotton...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
The Hood’s Brigade, 5th Texas Regiment, Company I Muster Roll, 1862-1864, contains an original copy and photocopy of the 4-page muster roll for Company I of the Fifth Texas Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade. The muster roll contains a list of members with rank and casualty record while the regiment was under the command of Confederate officer Jerome B. Robertson. This collection was processed by Chester V....
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members' questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
Discover the story of the plaza's transformation from the 1850s through the 1980s in historic photos. Journey counterclockwise around the plaza, starting at the Alamo, to learn more about the enterprising men and women who shaped the plaza as a destination. Interspersed between photos of the plaza's historic buildings, you will find windows into social life on the plaza.
This is an online historical exhibition depicting the the Annexation of Texas, the Mexican-American War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 1845–1848 created by the U.S. Department of State with historical documents found at the Office of the Historian in the Bureau of Public Affairs.
The Eugene C. Barker Texas History Collection was created in 1945 and named in honor of University of Texas professor Eugene Campbell Barker, a pioneer in the field of Texas history. The Barker Collection includes books, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, photographs, broadsides, and recorded sound and constitutes the most extensive collection of Texas-related material in existence. Includes: the Bexar Archives, 300,000...
This digital collection contains some 2,000 photographic images, real photographic postcards, books, historic documents, and maps of Texas. Of particular note are several collections of early photographic postcards showing Texas railroads, early oil fields and rigs, courthouses, military camps, parades, and events in small Texas towns.
This digital collection contains approximately 3,600 photographs, ca. 1846-1945, including Confederate and Union soldiers and officers in the Civil War and a wide spectrum of Texan citizens, including African American, American Indian, and Caucasian men, women, and children. The photographs provide a unique glimpse into the social and domestic history of Texas, as well as Texas architecture, transportation, ranching...
Through archeology, archival records, and oral history, the Ransom and Sarah Williams farmstead project has revealed the story of one African American family’s transition from slavery to freedom. In a larger sense it represents thousands of other African American families whose stories cannot be told.
This primary document comprises: The Constitution of the State of Texas, as Amended in 1861; The Constitution of the Confederate States of America; and The Ordinances of the Texas Convention: and An Address to the People of Texas. It was Printed by Order of the Convention and the Senate by John Marshall, State Printer, 1861, in Austin.
Journey through the African American culture and heritage in Texas, and discover a long and proud legacy that has undeniably shaped today’s Lone Star State mystique. Through hardships and triumphs, valor and determination, and influence and change, people of African descent have contributed greatly to our state’s development. Explore this website to discover these real stories and real places that define the history...
Special military orders for Captain R. Greene, Jr. Greene was empowered to inspect the Conscript officers in Western Texas.
Letter from Richard Greene to Richard Venables, dated April 8, 1864, with a suggestion that Venables apply for a position with General Greer. Includes a reply from Venables on the reverse, dated May 9, 1864. Venables gives an account of his recent illness, capture by the Yankees, and recovery.
Bio and Burial information on Albert Sidney Johnson at the Texas State Cemetery. This page includes links to related primary sources.
African Americans have been part of the landscape of Texas for as long as Europeans and their descendants. Spanning a period of more than five centuries, African-American presence began in 1528 with the arrival of Estevanico, an African slave who accompanied the first Spanish exploration of the land in the southwestern part of the United States that eventually became Texas. While African Americans have been...
The population database contains counts of slaves and slaveholders in each Texas county with surviving tax returns from the Republic of Texas era. During the years 1837 to 1845, residents of the Republic of Texas attempted to finance their new nation with taxes collected on a wide range of personal property held by local citizens. One of these categories of taxable property were the enslaved men and women held by...
Established in Houston in June 1838, and edited by Hamilton Stuart, the Civilian...
Founded just before the Texas Revolution in 1835, the Telegraph & Texas Registerbecame a thriving newspaper in the growing town of Houston during the Republic of Texas era. This section contains digitized articles from the newspaper that touch on the issues of slavery, cotton markets, and the annexation of Texas to the United States.
James F. Perry was the brother-in-law of Stephen F. Austin, the most prominent agent of American settlement in Mexican Texas. James Perry and his family came to Texas in the early 1830s, where he set up a plantation in Brazoria County called "Peach Point" and made money as a cotton planter. The digitized letters in this collection provide a window into Perry's management of his slaves and plantation,...
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