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One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This is a secondary source designed by Humanities Texas that include excerpts from the report of Lieutenant Neil M. Howison in 1846. If historical documents are passports for time travel, there is no better embarkation point than the stacks of the National Archives. On dimly lit shelves, gray Hollinger manuscript boxes and bound volumes preserve countless handwritten reports, petitions, and letters spanning more...
This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
This article provides an overview of the History of Public Education in Texas from the Texas Education Agency.
This is a primary online source held by the Texas State library and archives commission. It Features historical records that highlight the history of Texas during the Civil War and under the Rebel Flag. From 2011-2015, the United States commemorates the Sequiscentennial of the American Civil War. Texas was among those states voting to secede from the Union and join the Confederacy in 1861. From the embattled cotton...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is a compilation of primary sources, mainly early Texas History Maps, organized by the Texas General Land Office. The Texas General Land Office is proud to announce the donation of three more historic maps to our Archives. These maps, donated by Ms. Katherine Staat in memory of her uncle Chris Merrillat, augment our collection of 45,000 maps and sketches and enhance the GLO Archives — one of the premier...
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
The Hood’s Brigade, 5th Texas Regiment, Company I Muster Roll, 1862-1864, contains an original copy and photocopy of the 4-page muster roll for Company I of the Fifth Texas Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade. The muster roll contains a list of members with rank and casualty record while the regiment was under the command of Confederate officer Jerome B. Robertson. This collection was processed by Chester V....
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja speaks about how some tend to oversimplify Texas history and there is much more to the story. Dr. De la Teja discusses the unique worlds of Fray Margil and other characters in Texas in the Spanish Colonial period.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members' questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
This is the complete session with Dr. Jesus de la Teja. He discusses the origins of Mission San Jose and how history of how the Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the...
Discover the story of the plaza's transformation from the 1850s through the 1980s in historic photos. Journey counterclockwise around the plaza, starting at the Alamo, to learn more about the enterprising men and women who shaped the plaza as a destination. Interspersed between photos of the plaza's historic buildings, you will find windows into social life on the plaza.
This is an online historical exhibition depicting the the Annexation of Texas, the Mexican-American War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 1845–1848 created by the U.S. Department of State with historical documents found at the Office of the Historian in the Bureau of Public Affairs.
The Eugene C. Barker Texas History Collection was created in 1945 and named in honor of University of Texas professor Eugene Campbell Barker, a pioneer in the field of Texas history. The Barker Collection includes books, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, photographs, broadsides, and recorded sound and constitutes the most extensive collection of Texas-related material in existence. Includes: the Bexar Archives, 300,000...
This digital collection contains some 2,000 photographic images, real photographic postcards, books, historic documents, and maps of Texas. Of particular note are several collections of early photographic postcards showing Texas railroads, early oil fields and rigs, courthouses, military camps, parades, and events in small Texas towns.
Edited by J. Frank Dobie, 1924. Includes legends people, places, and supernatural events of Texas.
By Rahcel Lofton, Susie Hendrix and Jane Kennedy, 1926. A stirring narrative of adventure, hardship and privation in the early days of Texas, depicting struggles with the Indians and other adventures.
Journey through the African American culture and heritage in Texas, and discover a long and proud legacy that has undeniably shaped today’s Lone Star State mystique. Through hardships and triumphs, valor and determination, and influence and change, people of African descent have contributed greatly to our state’s development. Explore this website to discover these real stories and real places that define the history...
Copy of a grant to sell lots from Estate of Haden Edwards in town of Fredonia from the 1850s.
Government dues collected by J. F. C. Henderson at the General Land Office of the State of Texas for "Eight labors arable land at $5.00 per labor" and "Eighteen labors pasture land at $2.40 per labor" for a total of $83.20. Certificate noting payment received from John Hancock on the 3rd day of June, 1848.
Sam Houston seated holding cane and hat.
This shot of the 300 block of Main Street in 1856 is the oldest known photographic image in the Houston Metropolitan Research Center. It was copied by photographer, Frank Schlueter, from the R. C. Morris original. The wooden buildings burned down shortly thereafter, and were replaced by brick buildings.
African Americans have been part of the landscape of Texas for as long as Europeans and their descendants. Spanning a period of more than five centuries, African-American presence began in 1528 with the arrival of Estevanico, an African slave who accompanied the first Spanish exploration of the land in the southwestern part of the United States that eventually became Texas. While African Americans have been...
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