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This is a project developed through the generous support from the Humanities Media Project at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Liberal Arts, the African and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the Department of History. This website offers a digital visual history of Matagorda County by photographing archival documents and historical sites in the region. It expands on contemporary understandings...
This article is a secondary source on the flag makers of the Texas Revolution.
This book, includes transcriptions of original documents containing Mexican Col. Juan N. Almonte's 1834 report concerning the measures necessary to prevent the loss of Texas, as well as fifty of his letters, and the journal he kept while at the side of Santa Anna during the Texas rebellion in 1836. This book is part of the collection entitled: Texas State Historical Association Monographs and was provided by Texas...
This is primary document part of the online exhibit Texas 175: A Dozen Documents That Made a Difference featured by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This is an online copy of the original letter written by William Barrett Travis from the Alamo on February 24, 1836. At the Alamo in San Antonio, then called Bejar, 150 Texas rebels led by William Barret Travis made their stand against Santa Anna's...
This is a primary source that is part of the online exhibit of Texas 175: A Dozen Documents that Made a Difference. This is a letter written by Sam Houston and is held at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Historians still debate Sam Houston's strategy in taking the Texan army on a retreat eastward towards Louisiana rather than engaging immediately with Santa Anna's troops after the Battle of the Alamo...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
This is a database for Texas Newspapers that date back to the early 19th century. The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) partners with communities, publishers, and institutions to promote standards-based digitization of Texas newspapers and to make them freely accessible via The Portal to Texas History. Through continual outreach visits across Texas combined with advanced technological infrastructure and...
This is an in depth article on the generous donation of $25,000 by the Texas Society, Daughters of the American Revolution (TSDAR) for the conservation of Stephen F. Austin’s Registro, or Register of the Old 300, and several other related land grant documents from the Archives of the Texas General Land Office. The article explains that: Under the leadership of State Regent Joy Dabney Hagg, the TSDAR helped conserve...
This is a compilation of primary sources, mainly early Texas History Maps, organized by the Texas General Land Office. The Texas General Land Office is proud to announce the donation of three more historic maps to our Archives. These maps, donated by Ms. Katherine Staat in memory of her uncle Chris Merrillat, augment our collection of 45,000 maps and sketches and enhance the GLO Archives — one of the premier...
This newspaper article highlights how conservation experts, including A&M archaeologists have been working in conserving and restoring the LeBelle, the French Shipwreck discovered off the waters of Matagorda Bay in 1995. The article emphasises that the discovery brought to light 1.6 million artifacts from the ship and that currently the ship is now reassembled at the Bob Bullock State History Museum in Austin.
This is a newspaper article highlighting how the Dayton Historical Society has began research on the history of the rice industry in Liberty County Texas. The Dayton Historical Society took a look Monday night at the rice industry in Liberty County through the eyes of one of the few remaining connections to the grain in the area. Eileen Stoesser told 46 members and guests about the history of rice in America and...
This is a primary document of James Bowie's Mexican Land Grant Application from 1830. James "Jim" Bowie is considered one of the legendary figures in Texas history. Although not a native Texan, Bowie has become a folk hero known for both a large-bladed knife and the even larger fame gained at the battle of the Alamo. Before he came to Texas, the Kentucky-born Bowie was already well known in Louisiana— not as a...
This is a primary document of the letter that imprisoned Stephen Austin. It is featured at the Bullock Museum on the 182nd anniversary of Austin's imprisonment. After becoming an empresario in 1823, Stephen Austin worked diligently with the Mexican government to protect his colonists’ rights. Ten years after his arrival in present-day Texas, and 182 years ago today, this letter ordering his arrest signaled an end to...
This is a primary document of the Testimonio (Certified Copy) of Stephen F. Austin's Second Empresario Contract, the contract that allowed Stephen F. AUstin to bring 500 families to Mexican Texas. Often called "The Father of Texas," Stephen F. Austin carved out his place in history by bringing thousands of settlers to Mexican Texas from the United States. In the 1820s, Austin and his father, Moses, became land...
The Benson Latin American Collection and the Office of the Director of the Univeristy of Texas Libraries have jointly created this Collections Highlight online exhibition. This exhibition highlights Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's memoirs during his final exile in Havana in 1872. Sometimes referred to as “the Napoleon of the West,” Santa Anna — who served as president of Mexico in multiple, non-consecutive terms — is...
Dr. De la Teja discusses missionaries and Fray Margil in New Spain in Central American and Texas, focusing on the activities of the missions, which includes conversions of Natives.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja speaks about how some tend to oversimplify Texas history and there is much more to the story. Dr. De la Teja discusses the unique worlds of Fray Margil and other characters in Texas in the Spanish Colonial period.
In this video Dr. Frank de La Teja takes TSHA members' questions after his presentation "Understanding Spanish Texas through the Life of Fray Margil" in a live presentation from September 28, 2015.
This is the complete session with Dr. Jesus de la Teja. He discusses the origins of Mission San Jose and how history of how the Alamo along with the four other Spanish colonial missions in San Antonio became a World Heritage Site in the summer of 2015, making them the first places in Texas deemed to be of “outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity”. UNESCO’s recognition of the...
Texas Perspectives is a wire-style service produced by The University of Texas at Austin that is intended to provide media outlets with meaningful and thoughtful opinion columns (op-eds) on a variety of topics and current events. Authors are faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft columns that adhere to journalistic best practices and Associated Press style...
Refugio was established in 1795, but with rising problems and a failed mission of establishment, it wasn’t until 1828 that Refugio became a permanent settlement in Texas. Refugio played an important role in the Texas Revolution by forming together and electing Sam Houston and James Power to represent Refugio at the First Convention of Texas in order to form a new government, and at the Battle of Refugio, which took...
This companion piece to our Heritage Education program allows you to visit all five Spanish colonial missions with the click of a mouse. Find your way around the mission grounds with drawings from the 1890s, step back in time to visit the mission ruins in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and learn more about each mission's distinctive architectural features. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural...
This is an online historical exhibition depicting the the Annexation of Texas, the Mexican-American War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 1845–1848 created by the U.S. Department of State with historical documents found at the Office of the Historian in the Bureau of Public Affairs.
The Eugene C. Barker Texas History Collection was created in 1945 and named in honor of University of Texas professor Eugene Campbell Barker, a pioneer in the field of Texas history. The Barker Collection includes books, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, photographs, broadsides, and recorded sound and constitutes the most extensive collection of Texas-related material in existence. Includes: the Bexar Archives, 300,000...
By Rahcel Lofton, Susie Hendrix and Jane Kennedy, 1926. A stirring narrative of adventure, hardship and privation in the early days of Texas, depicting struggles with the Indians and other adventures.
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