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The bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941 catapulted America into World War II. In San Antonio, the potential threat of aerial bombardment and the need to strengthen Pan-American alliances, introduced new sights, sounds, and activities to the civilian population. Discover intriguing aspects of San Antonio's war years with this exhibit.
Discover the story of the plaza's transformation from the 1850s through the 1980s in historic photos. Journey counterclockwise around the plaza, starting at the Alamo, to learn more about the enterprising men and women who shaped the plaza as a destination. Interspersed between photos of the plaza's historic buildings, you will find windows into social life on the plaza.
This companion piece to our Heritage Education program allows you to visit all five Spanish colonial missions with the click of a mouse. Find your way around the mission grounds with drawings from the 1890s, step back in time to visit the mission ruins in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and learn more about each mission's distinctive architectural features. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural...
By the early autumn of 1862, Americans were reconciled to the fact that the military struggle to determine the fate of the Union was going to be a long and bloody one. Intense fighting was reflected in lengthy casualty lists printed in newspapers, and the names of small towns and rural communities where battles took place became burned into American collective memory: Manassas, Shiloh, Malvern Hill. The grim task of...
As students and faculty members resume their classwork at Garrison Hall this semester, it is worth examining Garrison Halls colorful history and architectural conception. The first stages of Garrisons development began in 1922 as the Board of Regents sought a new campus plan for the university. Although the Board had been employing the eminent New York City architect Cass Gilbert—whose achievements include the U.S....
Since its inception, Not Even Past has dedicated itself to the idea that historians and history students aren’t the only ones capable of writing and enjoying history. The University of Texas at Austin’s Physics Department has proven us right with the release of its new website “University of Texas at Austin: Physics Department History.” The website, created by Emeritus Professor Melvin Oakes, offers a remarkable...
Article about the McDonald Observatory and the National Science Foundation by David A. Conrad, professor at the University of Texas at Austin.
At the annual meeting of the Texas State Historical Association in March 2011, the luncheon for Women in Texas History was dedicated to Liz Carpenter. Among the remarks and remembrances, Michael L. Gillette, the Executive Director of Humanities Texas, offered a wonderful tribute based on materials and photographs from the LBJ Library & Museum at UT Austin. We were so impressed by the talk that we asked Mr....
This photograph captures a 1943 family outing to The University of Texas, in Austin. The young father, Fred Wong, was a grandson of one of Pershings "Chinese"--a group of 527 Chinese who accompanied General John J. Pershing into the United States after the failure of his campaigns against General Francisco Pancho Villa in 1917. Villa threatened retaliation against the Chinese for aiding Pershing, who determined to...
If you cross the Colorado River at Redbud Trail and look upstream toward Tom Miller Dam, there amid the tumbled rocks you can still see the wreck of Austins dream. In 1890, the citizens of Austin voted overwhelmingly to put themselves deeply in debt to build a dam, in hopes that the prospect of cheap waterpower would lure industrialists who would line the riverbanks with cotton mills. Austin would become the Lowell...
At the Republican presidential debate on September 7, Texas Governor Rick Perry surprised many listeners by responding to a question about the scientific evidence for global climate change by referring to the seventeenth-century century Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei. After claiming that the science is - is not settled on climate change, Perry went to say that The idea that we would put...
Setting aside large tracts of land for preservation and public use was a unique idea in the late nineteenth-century United States as the country focused on westward expansion and development. However, rather than moving to protect land untouched by human hands, the creation of the National Park System includes stories of people already using these spaces in a variety of ways. In 1872, the world’s first...
Austins moonlight towers have long been a distinctive part of the citys landscape, their lights casting a gentle glow on the streets 165 feet below. Though Austins fifteen surviving towers are now the last of their kind, this form of street lighting was once common across the United States; in fact, Austin acquired its towers secondhand from Detroit, which in the 1890s had the most extensive such system in the world.
It’s no secret that the Texas Legislature faces a daunting budget problem, with deficits estimated to be as little as $15 billion or as much as $27 billion or more. Constitutionally speaking, however, the actual deficit is about $4.3 billion. That’s the difference between what was appropriated for the 2010-2011 biennium and the revenue the Comptroller of Public Accounts says is now available to pay for it. According...
Our family knew Luling as a town one passed through quickly on trips from Austin to the Gulf coast, noticing only banners for the next “watermelon thump” and gaily decorated oil pump jacks. Recently it became my unlikely entry point into a visual appreciation of Texas Jewish history and more. I have taken photographs for about fifty years and, for the past twenty-five years have recorded signs of sacred life on the...
Relations between Mexico and the United States appear so disappointing these days that we may find it difficult to remember them differently. Mexico-U.S. relations, however, have seen better times and recalling them could serve as a model for what is possible. Claiming Rights and Righting Wrong in Texas does this by summoning the memory of World War II, when Mexico and the United States fashioned the closest and...
While I was in graduate school, I made a bit of needed extra money by turning a hobby, photography, into a short and modest career as a part-time photojournalist. Since then, I continued to take photographs but have kept them in the realm of my private life, until recently when I began to post them publicly on Flickr. One ongoing project of mine has been to photograph signs of spiritual life visible on the roads and...
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