header image
This is primary document part of the online exhibit Texas 175: A Dozen Documents That Made a Difference featured by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This is an online copy of the original letter written by William Barrett Travis from the Alamo on February 24, 1836. At the Alamo in San Antonio, then called Bejar, 150 Texas rebels led by William Barret Travis made their stand against Santa Anna's...
This primary source is part of the exhibit Texas 175: A Dozen Documents that Made a Difference featured online by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. This original color design sketch by Peter Krag shows the flag and seal for the Republic of Texas. It was approved on January 25, 1839, and signed on the top by Mirabeau Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas; John M. Hansford, Speaker of the Texas...
This is a primary source that is part of the online exhibit of Texas 175: A Dozen Documents that Made a Difference. This is a letter written by Sam Houston and is held at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Historians still debate Sam Houston's strategy in taking the Texan army on a retreat eastward towards Louisiana rather than engaging immediately with Santa Anna's troops after the Battle of the Alamo...
This is a primary source found at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. In this exhibit, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission presents its collection of historic flags -- forty in all -- for the first time. Information on each flag includes a high-resolution image and the documentation held by this institution. Many of these flags are too large and too endangered to be exhibited or handled....
Searchable database to original, photoreproduced, and compiled maps of Texas covering the period from the 17th-20th centuries.
Annotated typescript of biography of Galveston founder Michel Branamour Menard. The contents include a sketch on Menard from the Galveston Directory for 1866-1867, a discussion of Menard from Early Issues of Capital Stock, a sketch of Menard from the Galveston Daily News, and a memorandum by Sue Menard McCaleb. 38 page typescript biography of Michel Branamour Menard, annotated by Houston Wade.
The personal diary of Elizabeth Craw (1819-ca.1909) records her journey from Ohio to see her soldier fiancé in Texas, and her experiences there. Craw’s fiancé fought and died at the Battle of the Alamo, 1836. 40 page handwritten diary. Circa 60 completely blank pages at the end of the diary were not included in this digital representation. Travellers and explorers Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.)--Siege...
Medical log. 148 page handwritten medical record book describing Dr. Stewarts patients, their treatments, and fees. Among the patients is Mirabeau B. Lamar. Area includes Brazoria County and elsewhere in Texas.
Handwritten 4 page letter, torn in portions of fold. Written in 1837 from Houston, Forrest writes at length to his wife about Houston, and the illness of their son ;discusses the possible outbreak of war with Mexico ;talks of the Texas Congress meeting. This four-page letter gives an early look at life in the Republic of Texas.
Discussing the possible annexation of Texas to the United States, especially as regards slavery. Printed document, 16 pp. Document attributed to Edward Everett Hale.
This exhibition highlights the greatest treasures of the Texas State Library and Archives, from Travis' Letter from the Alamo to the original Ordinance of Secession, from historic flags to wanted posters from Sam Bass and Clyde Barrow.  New treasures and topics will be added on a periodic basis. 
Fear, Force, and Leather:The Texas Prison System's First Hundred Years, 1848 - 1948From humble beginnings with little money or public support, the Texas prison system eventually transformed into a self-supporting network of sugar and cotton farms.  But hellish conditions and brutal punishments led to one of the greatest scandals in Texas history, and began a cycle of reform that brought Texas to a new era...
At the time of the Texas Revolution, most Texans and Americans assumed that the Republic of Texas would be swiftly annexed to the United States.  Instead, the process of annexation took nine long and brusing years.  In hindsight, Texas annexation seems inevitable.  But it all could have been so different.
The sailors of Texas were vital to the survival of the Republic; they defended the coastline, ensured Texas supply lines, and brought in much-needed revenue from prizes and captures.  In this exhibit, adventue in the Gulf is paired with a political blood feud which brought the Navy crashing down amidst charges of piracy, mutiny, and murder.
For ten years, four very different men led the Republic of Texas down a difficult and unknown path as an independent nation.  Although these men were different - sawmill operator, soldier, poet, doctor - they were also much alike.  To a man they had known crushing failure.  Each had the heart and nerve to take the helm of a penniless, lawless land and dream of the mighty Texas it might one day become...
In the early days of Texas, a variety of currencies served as cash, including Spanish and Mexican money, bank notes from various U.S. states, and currency issued by private companies (call shinplasters). The Republic of Texas first issued paper money in 1837. This currency was called "star money" for the small star on the face of the bill. The star money was not face value currency, but rather interest-bearing notes...
So long as a state of war remained between the Republic of Mexico and the Republic of Texas, Texas could not enjoy the full benefits of independence, and diplomatic relations with other nations were hampered by Texas equivocal status. As the hope for immediate annexation to the United States died, efforts to negotiate a lasting peace with the Republic of Mexico increased. President Mirabeau B. Lamar worked actively...
Shooting the Decimated Prisoners drawn from life by Charles McLaughlin, one of the Mier prisoners. McLaughlin's drawings were published in 1845 in Thomas J. Green's classic memoir Journal of the Texian Expedition Against Mier.
Sam Houston ordered the secretary of state to remove the archives back to Houston. The citizens of Austin were determined to prevent the move. They formed a vigilante "Committee of Safety" and warned the heads of government in Austin that any attempts to move the official papers would be met with armed resistance. In December 1842, Houston announced that Austin was no longer the capital and ordered Colonel Thomas I...
On May 14, Santa Anna signed two peace treaties with interim Texas president David G. Burnet. The public treaty consisted of ten articles; a second, secret treaty consisted of six additional articles. The secret agreement was to be carried out when the public treaty had been fulfilled.
Many Americans, especially the filibusters, were angered over The Adams-Onis Treaty, which they considered to be a surrender to a despised foreign power and a denial of their right to go where they wished. Natchez, Mississippi was a center of resistance to the treaty, and a group of citizens planned a filibustering expedition to conquer Texas. James Long, a doctor and merchant, was placed in charge, and about 300...
The Republic of Texas article (Texas Treasures) at The Texas State Library & Archives Comission
Online exhibit on the Giants of Texas History.
Copies of historic paintings by Henry Arthur McArdle (including Dawn at the Alamo, The Battle of San Jacinto, The Settlement of Austins Colony, and many others).
Constitution of the State of Texas (1845)-joining the US.
avatar-url