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One of the largest special collections in the nation among schools of Southwestern’s size, the Edward A. Clark Collection was a gift of more than 2,400 volumes donated in 1965 from the private collection of Ambassador Edward A. Clark. It is rich in printed materials for the period of the Republic of Texas, the annexation of Texas by the United States, and Reconstruction. Also included in this collection are a number...
This collection contains materials from John Goodwin Tower, a Southwestern alumnus, represented Texas in the United States Senate from 1961 through 1984. Before his retirement, he named Southwestern University as the official repository for his papers. The approximately 800 linear feet of materials primarily reflect his Senate activities and include documents, legislative files, correspondence, speeches, campaign...
This collection contains roughly 70 interviews of Baytown residents which reflect the history of Baytown. This collection was created between 1968 to the early 1980s. The Baytown Oral History Collection includes stories on the following Texas topics: History of the Humble Oil & Refinery Co., Hurricane Carla, the Great Depression, a Baytown Lynching, History of (Middletown) Pelly, History of Baytown’s...
This collection consists of approximately 100 interviews of Baytown veterans who served in wars and during peacetime. These stories highlight experiences from World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and Operation Desert Storm.
This is a collection of oral histories from Baytown College consisting of 20 oral histories of World War II veterans which was done as part of a fiftieth anniversary of World War II by Barbara Cooper and her History students in the mid-1990s
Digital scans of Cat’s Claw, a bi-weekly student newspaper from Archer City High School are now available. The content of the newspaper includes information of interest to students along with advertising from years 1931-2015. These scans are collected in the Portal to Texas History, a database sponsored by the University of North Texas. The scans are included in Archer County Newspaper Collection.
Debra Winegarten. sociologist, lecturer and author of the biography "Oveta Culp Hobby - Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist," sits down to discuss Oveta's unique story and impact on Texas and the U.S. during WWII. Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995) had a lifetime of stellar achievement. During World War II, she was asked to build a women’s army from scratch—and did. Hobby became Director of the Women’s Army Corps and...
Dr. Dimmick answers questions after his talk on the Gonzales Cannon. He discusses his resources and documents, as well as the altercation.
Dimmick discusses the Gonzales Cannon(s) controversy from the Mexican side of history.
Dimmick discuses the Gonzales cannon(s) from the Mexican side of the story using archival evidence.
Dr. Dimmick discusses the roles of Green DeWitt, Texas empressario from Gonzales, and Ramon Musquiz, political chief of Bexar. The story begins with DeWitt writing a letter to Musquiz asking for a cannon to defend Gonzales. There are diverse accounts regarding the size and structure of the cannons, one document calls it a bronze cannon and the other an iron one.
Gregg Dimmick, MD, avocational archaeologist and expert on the Mexican Army in Texas, discusses the story of the 'Come and Take It' cannon from the Mexican viewpoint. Discover which cannon at Gonzales was of interest to the Mexican Army. Through examination of the Bexar County Archives, Dimmick presents his argument in this very interesting webinar.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions from the webinar audience. Dr. Crimm fields a number of questions related to her talk such as the Church, military, country and court records she used for researching these women. She also addresses the varied experiences of Petra Vela Kenedy and Patricia de Leon under Hispanic rule and Anglo law.
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra and Mifflin Kenedy. Petra came to Brownsville as an unmarried woman with several children. In Brownsville she meets a Pennsylvania Quaker who made a fortune off steam boating and was interested in ranching, Mifflin Kennedy. He becomes one of the richest ranchers next to Richard King in Texas. Two years after the birth of their first son together, Petra and Mifflin marry in 1854. They...
Dr. Crimm discusses Petra Vela, who becomes the wife of one of the two richest ranchers in Texas, Mifflin Kenedy. Dr. Crimm visited Mexico City to research Petra and her first husband, Louis Vidal, using the Mexican Military Archives. She noticed that Petra was in a census listed as a "servant" and did not appear to be married but her children bore Vidal's name. It appears that her children were born throughout...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia's legacy. During the Texas Revolution, General Rusk moved many Mexican families from the de Leon colony in an attempt to prevent them from aiding the Mexican government. During this instability, Patricia decides to move her family to New Orleans. She sold her ranch property to do this. By 1845 Patricia returns to Texas and her children scatter. Many get involved in court battles. Many...
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who have 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. Their colony's location creates political issues and discord, as it is surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commission and is in charge of assigning land to settlers...
Dr. Crimm discusses the politics in the de Leon colony (Victoria Colony). In 1824, Martin and Patricia de Leon, who have 10 children, set out to establish a colony in Texas. Their colony's location creates political issues and discord, as it is surrounded by the colonies of Austin, DeWitt, and many other Anglo settlers. Martin's son, Fernando, become the land commission and is in charge of assigning land to settlers...
Dr. Crimm discusses Patricia de Leon's life. Patricia donates her entire dowry to her husband to purchase land for what becomes the de Leon colony in Texas at the beginning of the 19th century. She gives birth to ten children who live through Mexican Independence in Mexico and Texas. The family returns to live in Mexico during the time of the Battle of Medina in Texas, which was devastating for many families and...
Dr. Crimm's full Texas Talks on two Tejano women: Patricia de Leon and Petra Vela Kenedy, recorded in December 2015, contrasts these women's experiences in 19th century Texas. Patricia de la Garza de Leon was born in 1775 from a prominent Mexican family. She inherited a fortune from her father, which she used, along with her empresario husband, Martin de Leon’s money earned from the sale of livestock to establish...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Galvez as the governor of New Orleans, detailing his marriage and family, as well as military successes in the region.
Dr. Crimm discusses the military experiences of Galvez, who as a young lieutenant was assigned to Chihuahua. He was charged with defeating the Apache in this desolate region and inspired his men to to bravery. Galvez learns the meaning of command in Mexico. He also meets and defeats the Apache, taking them captive. Back in Chihuahua, instead of punishing them, Galvez learns their language and speaks to them. He...
Dr. Crimm discusses the experiences of Bernardo de Galvez and the outcome of the Louisiana Purchase and the governance of Louisiana by Spain.
Dr. Crimm discusses the Galvez family, including the life of Bernardo’s uncle Jose de Galvez, who came from humble beginnings and made an enduring impact on history due to his influence on the Bourbon monarch Spain’s King Charles III. Crimm also discusses the role of Creoles in the New Spain, who eventually lead to Mexico's independence from Spain.
Dr. Crimm takes live questions and answers after her talk on November 2, 2015 on Berdardo de Galvez. She discusses his treks to the Pacific, how he funded and smuggled supplies to the Americans during the Revolutionary War, the legacy of Galvez in Mexico and the first cattle drive from Texas to Louisiana.
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