The Texas Semester

Staff DevelopmentTHE TEXAS SEMESTER is a journey of physical and intellectual dimensions. Texans feel a spiritual connection to the land; one can’t understand why without experiencing the vastness and diversity of our landscape. Weekly trips from Abilene directed by our professors are a crucial component of the curriculum. Then, the semester concludes with an epic road trip, a three-week tour of the state’s geographic regions, including visits to historic sites, archival repositories, natural wonders, and some of the state’s finest restaurants. Leading authorities provide access and expertise about which tourists can only dream. If you possess the drive, dedication, and imagination, THE TEXAS SEMESTER will provide an adventure to last a lifetime. The road will be long, the demands many and stringent. We limit enrollment to ten highly qualified participants. Faculty mentors seek to create a close-knit community and life-long associations. Those who complete the instruction are equipped to enjoy a long-term participation in the life of Texas, to fill key positions in politics, public policy, business, and education. When we say this journey is demanding, believe us. This is not a program for whiners, slackers, or prima donnas. Bring blue jeans and come ready to work. Those selected for the journey will earn their pride. Those who finish it will have earned their spurs—and their swagger.  
Source:McMurry University
URL:http://www.mcm.edu/newsite/web/academics/ssr/history/texas/
Grade Level:Both
TEKS:4.1(B), 4.1(D), 4.2(A), 4.2(B), 4.2(C), 4.2(E), 4.2(D), 4.3(A), 4.3(D), 4.3(E), 4.3(C), 4.4(A), 4.4(B), 4.4(C), 4.4(D), 4.5(A), 4.5(C), 7.1(A), 7.1(B), 7.1(C), 7.2(A), 7.2(B), 7.2(E), 7.2(D), 7.3(A), 7.2(F), 7.3(B), 7.3(C), 7.4(A), 7.4(B), 7.5(A), 7.5(B), 7.6(A), 7.6(B), 7.7(B), 7.7(C), 7.7(D), 7.7(E), 7.7(F)
Topics:Prehistory, Spanish Texas, Mexican Texas, Texas Revolution, Republic of Texas, Antebellum Texas, Civil War, Reconstruction, Late Nineteenth-Century, Progressive Era, Texas in the 1920s, Great Depression, World War II, Texas Since World War II

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